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  1. Member
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    #1

    "a XX magnitude earthquake" and "a magnitude XX earthquake"

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/sns-rt-international-us-sptre74a61m-20110511,0,371370.story?track=rss
    In 1969 a 7.8 magnitude earthquake killed 19 people in the southern town of Huelva, according to Spain's National Geographic Institute.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/05/01/kazakhstan-quake-idUSLDE74000D20110501
    A magnitude 5.4 earthquake was recorded in eastern Kazakhstan on Sunday, the U.S. Geological Survey said.

    Are both "a XX magnitude earthquake" and "a magnitude XX earthquake" correct?

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "a XX magnitude earthquake" and "a magnitude XX earthquake"



    b

  3. VIP Member
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    #3

    Re: "a XX magnitude earthquake" and "a magnitude XX earthquake"

    Quote Originally Posted by sunsunmoon View Post
    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/sns-rt-international-us-sptre74a61m-20110511,0,371370.story?track=rss
    In 1969 a 7.8 magnitude earthquake killed 19 people in the southern town of Huelva, according to Spain's National Geographic Institute.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/05/01/kazakhstan-quake-idUSLDE74000D20110501
    A magnitude 5.4 earthquake was recorded in eastern Kazakhstan on Sunday, the U.S. Geological Survey said.

    Are both "a XX magnitude earthquake" and "a magnitude XX earthquake" correct?

    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) What an interesting question. I had never given this matter

    much thought before.

    (2) I did some googling, and -- yes -- both ways seem to be

    used.

    (3) I was able to find a website maintained by the government

    of the United States of America. It is called the

    National Earthquake Information Center.

    (a) It referred to:

    the M9.0 Great Tohoku Earthquake, March 11, 2011.

    Then later, it referred to it as:

    The magnitude 9.0 Tohoku earthquake.


    (4) I am a person who likes rules and experts' decisions. It gives

    me a feeling of confidence. So if the United States government

    uses the word "magnitude" first, then that is what I would do if

    I ever had to report an earthquake's magnitude.


    Respectfully yours,


    James


    P.S. Thanks again for your question. I learned something new

    today.

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