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  1. poorboy_9's Avatar
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    #1

    countable/ uncountable

    I've opened a can of worms (and started some good discussions); is "noodles" a countable or uncountable noun?
    I must admit up front that I've argued both sides of this question. (Fr. Knapp, h.s. debate coach, you should see me now! LOL)

  2. youandcorey's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: countable/ uncountable

    Noodles is a plural form of a noodle which is a countable noun.

    Look! There is a noodle on your shirt. These noodles are too delicious to waste wearing on your clothes!

  3. poorboy_9's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: countable/ uncountable

    ...so the correct sentence should read: " The Dr. said I should eat fewer noodles", rather than "...less noodles"?

  4. poorboy_9's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: countable/ uncountable

    p.s. .....what about "Chicken Noodle Soup" = only one noodle?

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    #5

    Re: countable/ uncountable

    Quote Originally Posted by poorboy_9 View Post
    p.s. .....what about "Chicken Noodle Soup" = only one noodle?
    Not a teacher.

    'Noodle soup', as well as 'strawberry sorbet', 'apple pie' or 'potato chips', doesn't mean there's only one noodle in the soup. 'Noodle' turns the word combination into a compound noun.

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