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    #1

    Meaning of Witticisms

    Much grateful if you teachers could tell me the meanings of the following witticisms:

    "Outside every thin person is a fat one trying to get in."

    "I don’t understand why people insist that marriage is doomed—all five of mine worked out.”

    "Television is for appearing on, not looking at.”

    "A verbal contract isn’t worth the paper it’s written on.”

    "What's up Doc? (FYI, here "up" is a preposition not adverb.)(This one is not a witty remarks but I just want to know its meaning.)

    Thank you.
    Last edited by Deepurple; 17-May-2011 at 07:50.

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    #2

    Re: Meaning of Witticisms

    "Outside every thin person is a fat one trying to get in."
    This is an inversion of a common saying that inside every fat person is a thin one trying to get out.

    "I don’t understand why people insist that marriage is doomed—all five of mine worked out.”
    If this person has had 5 marriages, then at least 4 of them were "doomed."

    "Television is for appearing on, not looking at.”
    People who are on TV don't waste their time watching it.

    "A verbal contract isn’t worth the paper it’s written on.”
    Verbal contracts are not written down.

    What's up Doc?
    What's up Doc?

  1. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Meaning of Witticisms

    Quote Originally Posted by Deepurple View Post
    Much grateful if you teachers could tell me the meanings of the following witticisms:

    "Outside every thin person is a fat one trying to get in."
    Every slender person is just a few cookies or cakes away from becoming overweight. They secretly desire calories and only remain thin by ignoring the temptation to indulge in fattening foods.

    "I don’t understand why people insist that marriage is doomed—all five of mine worked out.”
    Technically, marriage is supposed to be "until death do us part", so ideally a person should get married once and it will last forever. A person married multiple times is perpetuating the idea that marriage never lasts and that divorce is very common.

    "Television is for appearing on, not looking at.”
    Television was once thought of as the "ghetto" or last resort for actors - true artists appeared only on the stage or in films. Back in the 1950s and 60s, if a prominent movie or stage actors appeared on television it was assumed that he did it strictly for the money, which is basically what this quote means. Spoken from an actor's point of view, it means he'll appear on the small screen to earn a paycheck but he doesn't necessarily watch television.

    "A verbal contract isn’t worth the paper it’s written on.”
    Samuel Goldwyn was famous for his malapropisms. Usually his statements contained contradictory facts which made them unintentionally humorous; for example, a verbal contract isn't written down, it's strictly oral. Another of his famous sayings: "I don't think anybody should write his autobiography until after he's dead." Obviously someone is unable to write anything after they're dead!

    "What's up Doc? (FYI, here "up" is a preposition not adverb.)(This one is not a witty remarks but I just want to know its meaning.)
    Bugs Bunny's famous catch-phrase was inserted into the cartoon rabbit's dialog by director Tex Avery, who'd heard it often while growing up in Texas. "What's up?" is a common way in AmE to ask "How are you?" or "What's new?" or "What's going on?" "Doc" is an abbreviation for "doctor." Avery didn't know why kids at his school used "doc", it was just a slang phrase (they weren't literally talking to physicians at the time).

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