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    #1

    "off of it"??

    hello, I need native speakers' help!

    "He not only wants to be the champion of the competition floor, but he also strives to be champions off of it. "

    my question: do I need "of" here to make the sentence correct?

    how about just say" ...champions off it"?

    Thanks a lot

    paula

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    #2

    Re: "off of it"??

    Quote Originally Posted by paula View Post
    hello, I need native speakers' help!

    "He not only wants to be the champion of the competition floor, but he also strives to be champions off of it. "

    my question: do I need "of" here to make the sentence correct?

    how about just say" ...champions off it"?

    Thanks a lot

    paula
    NOT A TEACHER.

    Some people consider "off of" incorrect, but it's quite common in informal English. In any case, you don't need "of."

    "He not only wants to be the champion on the competition floor, but he also strives to be the champion off it."

    "Competition floor" is not something I would say. "Court" or "field" might be better options.
    Last edited by Allen165; 17-May-2011 at 12:40.

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    #3

    Re: "off of it"??

    Do I need "of" here to make the sentence correct?
    No - of is redundant. You will rarely hear off of from speakers of BE.

    It is commonly heard in colloquial AE, and our American friends will no doubt comment when they get up in a few hours.

    Rover

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    #4

    Re: "off of it"??

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    No - of is redundant. You will rarely hear off of from speakers of BE.

    It is commonly heard in colloquial AE, and our American friends will no doubt comment when they get up in a few hours.

    Rover
    Ghastly!
    "He wants to be champion not only off of the floor but also on of it." (?)

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    #5

    Re: "off of it"??

    I believe off of is used by analogy with out of.

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    #6

    Re: "off of it"??

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    No - of is redundant. You will rarely hear off of from speakers of BE.

    It is commonly heard in colloquial AE, and our American friends will no doubt comment when they get up in a few hours.

    Rover
    Hey! You! Get off of my cloud!

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    #7

    Re: "off of it"??

    Quote Originally Posted by paula View Post
    hello, I need native speakers' help!

    "He not only wants to be the champion of the competition floor, but he also strives to be champions off of it. "

    my question: do I need "of" here to make the sentence correct?

    how about just say" ...champions off it"?

    Thanks a lot

    paula

    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) Here is some advice from the 1993 edition of The Columbia Guide to

    Standard American English by Professor Kenneth G. Wilson.

    (a) off of = compound preposition.

    (b) It is common in casual (informal) speech:

    Get your elbows off of the table.

    (c) Avoid it in semi-formal and formal writing.

    (2) Therefore, you might consider saying/writing:

    He not only wants to be a champion on the competition floor, but

    he also wants to be a champion off it.

    (3) And here is what Webster's Dictionary of English Usage says:

    If it is part of your personal idiom and you are not writing on

    an especially elevated plane, you have no reason to avoid off of.

    I think that this means in plain English:

    If it sounds all right to you, use it. But if you are writing something

    formal (such as a research paper at the university), it would be

    better not to use it.


    Respectfully yours,


    James

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