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    #1

    "those who do something" and "those doing something"



    Health Benefits of Coffee | Suite101.com
    Coffee is a natural diuretic, which can cause humans to urinate more frequently. Those who drink large amounts of coffee on a regular basis may find themselves running to the rest room more often.

    Drinking Coffee Helps Avoid Prostate Cancer, Study Says - FoxNews.com
    The men least likely to develop lethal prostate cancer were those drinking six or more cups of coffee a day, but even those drinking no more than three cups a day lowered the risk by 30 percent, the 12-year study found.
    - those who do something
    - those doing something

    Are these phrases interchangeable?

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    #2

    Re: "those who do something" and "those doing something"

    Quote Originally Posted by sunsunmoon View Post


    Health Benefits of Coffee | Suite101.com
    Coffee is a natural diuretic, which can cause humans to urinate more frequently. Those who drink large amounts of coffee on a regular basis may find themselves running to the rest room more often.

    Drinking Coffee Helps Avoid Prostate Cancer, Study Says - FoxNews.com
    The men least likely to develop lethal prostate cancer were those drinking six or more cups of coffee a day, but even those drinking no more than three cups a day lowered the risk by 30 percent, the 12-year study found.
    - those who do something
    - those doing something

    Are these phrases interchangeable?
    Probably, in most cases.

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    #3

    Re: "those who do something" and "those doing something"

    I don't see any example of them not being interchangable, but there is one clear difference. When you use a who-clause, you can choose whether you want to use a simple tense or a continuous tense. There is no such possibility when you use a participle.

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    #4

    Re: "those who do something" and "those doing something"

    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) Birdeen's Call gave us an excellent reminder: the adjective clause can change the

    form of the verb.

    (2) Professor Quirk in his famous A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language

    (1985 edition, p. 1263) gives this example:

    The person writing reports is my colleague.

    (3) The distinguished professor then tells us that a relative (adjective) clause is

    much more explicit (clear; no confusion; exact):

    The person who WILL WRITE/ WILL BE WRITING/ WRITES/ IS WRITING/ WROTE/WAS WRITING

    (4) On page 1297, the professor makes a very interesting point that you and I might

    consider when we write something.

    (a) He gives this sentence (I have added a bit):

    Do you know the man and woman in the corner nearest the door TALKING TO JOHN?

    The great professor explains that "many users" would prefer " WHO ARE TALKING TO

    JOHN." Why? Because the head ("man and woman" ) is pretty far away from the

    participial clause/phrase.

    Thus, maybe it might have been better if the Fox News item had used the adjective

    clause, for there are 8 words between the head "men" and the participial phrase.

    (5) Finally, the professor says something very interesting:

    "It must be emphasized that -ing forms in postmodifying clauses should NOT [my

    emphasis] be seen as abbreviated progressive forms in relative clauses."

    IF (a big "if"!!!) I understand him, that means that "drinking coffee" is NOT a shorter

    way to say "who drinks/drank/ is drinking [etc.] coffee." Most books for the average

    person tell us that it is an abbreviation. Professor Quirk disagrees.


    Respectfully yours,


    James


    Thanks for your great question. I learned a lot.

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