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  1. Banned
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    #1

    bad vs badly when used as Adverb

    Dear teachers,

    Can bad be used as an Adverb in the second example that has the same meaning as sentence 1?

    1. Peter cooks badly.
    2. Peter cooks bad.

    Thanks.

    Kitty

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: bad vs badly when used as Adverb

    Quote Originally Posted by kwfine View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Can bad be used as an Adverb in the second example that has the same meaning as sentence 1?

    1. Peter cooks badly.
    2. Peter cooks bad.

    Thanks.

    Kitty
    No.

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    #3

    Re: bad vs badly when used as Adverb

    In some regional forms, you will come across usage like that, but not in standard usage.

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    #4

    Re: bad vs badly when used as Adverb

    Peter is a bad cook. He cooks badly. His cooking skills are sub-par.
    His hamburgers taste like old sneakers.

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    #5

    Re: bad vs badly when used as Adverb

    Bad is often used informally as an adverb by native speakers.

    'I need that scholarship so bad that it hurts.'

    'I broke my leg in two places. Boy, it really hurt bad!'

    Rover

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    #6

    Re: bad vs badly when used as Adverb

    Rover has made an interesting point.

    While "He cooks bad" sound awful to me, "It hurts so bad!" or "I need it so bad!" do not. (The addition of "so" makes a difference to my ear, in any case.

    I wonder if "cooks," as a verb of action, needs that true adverb (badly) while "hurts" or "needs" is more of a stative (right term?) verb.

    I'm just asking - not suggesting! I don't know why one is objectionable and the other is not.

    Any ideas?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #7

    Re: bad vs badly when used as Adverb

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Rover has made an interesting point.

    While "He cooks bad" sound awful to me, "It hurts so bad!" or "I need it so bad!" do not. (The addition of "so" makes a difference to my ear, in any case.

    I wonder if "cooks," as a verb of action, needs that true adverb (badly) while "hurts" or "needs" is more of a stative (right term?) verb.

    I'm just asking - not suggesting! I don't know why one is objectionable and the other is not.

    Any ideas?

    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) The moderator has made an excellent point.

    (2) "I hurt his feelings. Now I feel bad." (NOT: "badly," as so

    many native speakers say.)

    Respectfully yours,


    James

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    #8

    Re: bad vs badly when used as Adverb

    I avoid this problem by never feeling bad (or badly).

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    #9

    Re: bad vs badly when used as Adverb

    Quote Originally Posted by kwfine View Post
    Can bad be used as an adverb in the second example that has the same meaning as sentence 1?
    "Adverb" is a common noun, so we do not capitalize it in the middle of a sentence.

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    #10

    Re: bad vs badly when used as Adverb

    (2) "I hurt his feelings. Now I feel bad."
    In this sentence, bad is an adjective.

    Rover

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