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    #1

    consider

    1- I consider him wrong.
    or
    I consider him to be wrong.
    2- I consider him my friend.
    or
    I consider him to be my friend.
    Please, tell which ones are correct.After "consider", where to use "to be" and where not to use?

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    #2

    Re: consider

    Quote Originally Posted by tipu s View Post
    1- I consider him wrong.
    or
    I consider him to be wrong.
    2- I consider him my friend.
    or
    I consider him to be my friend.
    Please, tell which ones are correct.After "consider", where to use "to be" and where not to use?

    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) You have asked a great question.

    (2) I found an answer in Professor Paul Roberts's Understanding Grammar.

    (3) The professor gives these examples:

    I consider him a liar.

    I consider him to be a liar.

    I consider that he is a liar.

    Which is correct? They are all correct.

    (4) What are the differences in grammar?

    (a) I consider him a liar. = "a liar" describes "him." Books call "a liar" in this

    sentence a "objective complement." What is the object of "consider"?

    Answer: him. If you say "I consider him," people will ask you to

    "complete" the sentence. You need a "complement." So you complete

    "him" by adding "a liar." I consider him a liar./ a hero./ my friend.

    (b) I consider him to be a liar. Many (not all) books say that "him

    to be my friend" is a so-called infinitive clause. It is the object of

    "consider." I consider him to be a liar./ her to be a hero./ them to be

    experts.

    (c) I consider that he is a liar. "That he is a liar" is a noun clause. A

    noun clause is often a substitute for the word "something." I consider

    something. What? Answer: That he is a liar.

    (4) Since you are a learner, I sincerely suggest that you use the

    infinitive clause:

    I consider him to be wrong.

    I consider him to be my friend.


    Respectfully yours,


    James

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