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    #1

    About Tense.

    What is the difference among "I love you" , "I have loved you" ,and
    "I have been loving you."?

    Please tell me about "Present", "Perfect Present", and "Perfect Progressive Tense" .

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    #2

    Re: About Tense.

    "I love you" describes your state of mind at the moment. "I have loved you" implies that I started to love you in the past and I still love you or it could mean I don't love you now but you have to look at at the wider context. The third structure is not normally used, since state verbs don't make much sense in the progressive form.
    The progressive aspect(not tense) generally implies incompletion, temporariness, and continuity. However, you have to consider the meaning of the verb.

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    #3

    Re: About Tense.

    Quote Originally Posted by ClarkKe View Post
    What is the difference among "I love you" , "I have loved you" ,and
    "I have been loving you."?

    Please tell me about "Present", "Perfect Present", and "Perfect Progressive Tense" .

    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) Husband: I know that sometimes I am difficult to live with. Why are

    you always so patient and understanding?



    Wife: It's very simple. Because I love you.

    ***

    (2) Wife: Was it love at first sight?

    Husband: It certainly was. I have loved you since I first saw

    you at the mall that day 30 years ago.

    ***

    (3) As Mr. Moss told us, the present perfect progressive is usually

    not used with so-called stative verbs (want, desire, love, hate, like,

    dislike, etc.)

    (a) But Mesdames Celce-Murcia and Larsen-Freeman say that

    sometimes it is possible if you add an expression of change over

    time or of exceptionally strong feeling. Sadly, the two scholars

    do not give an example in their The Grammar Book. This is only my idea:

    James: I can't believe that you really love me. I'm old, ugly, and

    poor. Do you love me, really?

    Mona: Do I love you? I love you now more than I loved you when

    we met ten years ago.

    James: Really?

    Mona: Darling, I have been loving you more and more

    with every passing year.


    Respectfully yours,


    James

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