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    #1

    Public order

    "Those young guys usually have profligate/dissolute parties, and when they're drunk they derange/disturb public order in this neighborhood."

    Does this sentence make sense and sound good in conversations?

    Thank you so much

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    #2

    Re: Public order

    Quote Originally Posted by namloan View Post
    "Those young guys usually have profligate/dissolute parties, and when they're drunk they derange/disturb public order in this neighborhood."

    Does this sentence make sense and sound good in conversations?

    Thank you so much

    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) You have written a very nice sentence.


    (2) I might write:

    Those young guys often have wild parties, and when they're

    drunk, they disturb the peace in our neighborhood.


    Respectfully yours,


    James


    P.S. I believe that "derange" cannot be used that way.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Public order

    I think you may be confusing "disturb" with the French equivalent "derange".

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Public order

    Quote Originally Posted by namloan View Post
    "Those young guys usually have profligate/dissolute parties, and when they're drunk they derange/disturb public order in this neighborhood."

    Does this sentence make sense and sound good in conversations?

    Thank you so much
    You have a good vocabulary but, no, that is not conversational. Those guys throw rowdy parties, and then they get drunk and disturb their neighbors.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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