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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    De-construct-ing a poem?

    Poetry is one my weakness in english haha, just need to de construct too Australian poems
    reckin you can help me?

    A Brown Slouch Hat
    There is a symbol, we love and adore it,
    You see it daily wherever you go.
    Long years have passed since our fathers once wore it,
    What is the symbol that we should all know?
    It's a brown slouch hat with the side turned up, and it means the world to me.
    It’s the symbol of our Nation—the land of liberty.
    And as soldiers they wear it, how proudly they bear it, for all the world to see.
    Just a brown slouch hat with the side turned up, heading straight for victory.
    Don't you thrill as young Bill passes by?
    Don't you beam at the gleam in his eye?
    Head erect, shoulders square, tunic spic and span,
    Ev'ry inch a soldier and ev'ry inch a man.
    As they swing down the street, aren't they grand?
    Three abreast to the beat of the band,
    But what do we remember when the boys have passed along?
    Marching by so brave and strong.
    Just a brown ....





    Not a Hero
    The ANZAC Day march was over - the old Digger had done his best.
    His body ached from marching - it was time to sit and rest.
    He made his way to a park bench and sat with lowered head.
    A young boy passing saw him - approached and politely said,
    "Please sir do you mind if I ask you what the medals you wear are for?
    Did you get them for being a hero, when fighting in a war?"
    Startled, the old Digger moved over and beckoned the boy to sit.
    Eagerly the lad accepted - he had not expected this!
    "First of all I was not a hero," said the old Digger in solemn tone,
    "But I served with many heroes, the ones that never came home.
    So when you talk of heroes, it's important to understand,
    The greatest of all heroes gave their lives defending this land.
    "The medals are worn in their honour, as a symbol of respect.
    All diggers wear them on ANZAC Day - it shows they don't forget."
    The old digger then climbed to his feet and asked the boy to stand.
    Carefully he removed the medals and placed them in his hand.
    He told him he could keep them - to treasure throughout his life,
    A legacy of a kind - left behind - paid for in sacrifice.
    Overwhelmed the young boy was speechless - he couldn’t find words to say.
    It was there the old Digger left him - going quietly on his way.
    In the distance the young boy glimpsed him - saw him turn and wave goodbye.
    Saddened he sat alone on the bench - tears welled in his eyes.
    He never again saw him ever - but still remembers with pride,
    When the old Digger told him of Heroes and a young boy sat and cried.

    any metaphors or smilees ( how ever its spelled ) and ther other techniques.


    Please help me!


    Sorry if wrong section, i'm new here.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: De-construct-ing a poem?

    Quote Originally Posted by Samzon View Post
    Poetry is one my weakness in English haha, just need to de construct two Australian poems
    reckin you can help me?

    A Brown Slouch Hat
    There is a symbol, we love and adore it,
    You see it daily wherever you go.
    Long years have passed since our fathers once wore it,
    What is the symbol that we should all know?
    It's a brown slouch hat with the side turned up, and it means the world to me.
    It’s the symbol of our Nation—the land of liberty.
    And as soldiers they wear it, how proudly they bear it, for all the world to see.
    Just a brown slouch hat with the side turned up, heading straight for victory.
    Don't you thrill as young Bill passes by?
    Don't you beam at the gleam in his eye?
    Head erect, shoulders square, tunic spic and span,
    Ev'ry inch a soldier and ev'ry inch a man.
    As they swing down the street, aren't they grand?
    Three abreast to the beat of the band,
    But what do we remember when the boys have passed along?
    Marching by so brave and strong.
    Just a brown ....





    Not a Hero
    The ANZAC Day march was over - the old Digger had done his best.
    His body ached from marching - it was time to sit and rest.
    He made his way to a park bench and sat with lowered head.
    A young boy passing saw him - approached and politely said,
    "Please sir do you mind if I ask you what the medals you wear are for?
    Did you get them for being a hero, when fighting in a war?"
    Startled, the old Digger moved over and beckoned the boy to sit.
    Eagerly the lad accepted - he had not expected this!
    "First of all I was not a hero," said the old Digger in solemn tone,
    "But I served with many heroes, the ones that never came home.
    So when you talk of heroes, it's important to understand,
    The greatest of all heroes gave their lives defending this land.
    "The medals are worn in their honour, as a symbol of respect.
    All diggers wear them on ANZAC Day - it shows they don't forget."
    The old digger then climbed to his feet and asked the boy to stand.
    Carefully he removed the medals and placed them in his hand.
    He told him he could keep them - to treasure throughout his life,
    A legacy of a kind - left behind - paid for in sacrifice.
    Overwhelmed the young boy was speechless - he couldn’t find words to say.
    It was there the old Digger left him - going quietly on his way.
    In the distance the young boy glimpsed him - saw him turn and wave goodbye.
    Saddened he sat alone on the bench - tears welled in his eyes.
    He never again saw him ever - but still remembers with pride,
    When the old Digger told him of Heroes and a young boy sat and cried.

    any metaphors or smilees ( how ever its spelled ) and ther other techniques.


    Please help me!


    Sorry if wrong section, I'm new here.
    This looks like homework. We don't do your work for you.

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    #3

    Re: De-construct-ing a poem?

    Quote Originally Posted by Samzon View Post

    Poetry is one of my weaknesses in English. haha, I just need to deconstruct two Australian poems.
    Reckon you can help me?

    (Poems omitted.)

    Any metaphors or similes or ther other techniques?

    Sorry if wrong section; I'm new here.
    Rover

  3. Newbie
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    #4

    Re: De-construct-ing a poem?

    Its not homework, i just need to descontruct and find similies etc.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: De-construct-ing a poem?

    Here's how the poems were written.
    http://www.anzacday.org.au/anzacservices/poetry/slouch_hat.htm
    http://www.anzacday.org.au/anzacservices/poetry/not_a_hero.htm

    You shouldn't change the structure of a poem as it appears on the page. There are many poems that rely for their effect on spatial elements.

    Why don't you identify and post the examples that you've found, and we can comment on them?
    It might also be useful if you could explain how a need to identify metaphors and similes in two specific poems is not homework.

    PS: 'Deconstructing' is a non-hyphenated word. Also, identifying figurative language is not technically deconstruction.

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    #6

    Re: De-construct-ing a poem?

    I've no idea how you would deconstruct a poem.

    I certainly wouldn't consider finding out how to do so if it hadn't been set as a homework assignment.

    Rover

  5. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: De-construct-ing a poem?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    I've no idea how you would deconstruct a poem.

    I certainly wouldn't consider finding out how to do so if it hadn't been set as a homework assignment.

    Rover
    It looks to me as though it's GCSE English coursework, it's the sort of question that they had in last years exam.

  6. 5jj's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: De-construct-ing a poem?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    I've no idea how you would deconstruct a poem.
    I hadn't, either. It seems to be just analysing it to find out what it means. There are several guidesheets on how to do it if you google 'deconstructing poems'.

    Dull. It appears to be a good way to destroy a young person's feeling for poems, in my opinion.

  7. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: De-construct-ing a poem?

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    I hadn't, either. It seems to be just analysing it to find out what it means. There are several guidesheets on how to do it if you google 'deconstructing poems'.

    Dull. It appears to be a good way to destroy a young person's feeling for poems, in my opinion.
    Last year they did the "war poets". Beautiful poems, many of them, it's a shame to analyse them to death.
    Last edited by bhaisahab; 22-May-2011 at 20:26.

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    #10

    Re: De-construct-ing a poem?

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    I hadn't, either. It seems to be just analysing it to find out what it means. There are several guidesheets on how to do it if you google 'deconstructing poems'.

    Dull. It appears to be a good way to destroy a young person's feeling for poems, in my opinion.
    This is the one thing people do at school that I could never understand. It doesn't seem to serve any purpose at all. Young people in Poland don't learn what a derivative of a function is, but have to know their pars-pro-totos and caesuras. I think it's completely misguided.
    Last edited by birdeen's call; 23-May-2011 at 00:25.

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