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    #1

    burgle or break in

    Multiple choice:
    1. Chris is in a terrible state. Her house was ……………….last night
    A robbed B stolen C burgled D broken in
    I chose D. broken in but the answer is C. burgled
    I find no difference:
    _break in/ into sth: to get into a building or car using force, usually to steal sth.
    _burgle: to enter a building illegal, usually using force, and steal from it
    (Oxford Advance Learner's Compass)

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: burgle or break in

    You break into a house, and your house is broken into.

    Burgle and break into, burgled and broken into -- those match, but not just broken in.

    When your shoes or jeans fit you just right because they've been worn a bit, those are broken in.

    *I'm not sure if it's break into or break in to, and welcome a correction on that.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: burgle or break in

    To break in means to make fit for use, as in leather shoes. To break into means to force entry, as in a house.

  3. AlexAD's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: burgle or break in

    Hello.

    May we say, 'Her house robbed last night'?

    Thanks,

    Alex.

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: burgle or break in

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexAD View Post
    Hello.

    May we say, 'Her house robbed last night'?

    Thanks,

    Alex.
    No. She was robbed, her house was broken into/burgled.

  5. AlexAD's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: burgle or break in

    But we can say, 'He robbed the house', can't we?

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    #7

    Re: burgle or break in

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexAD View Post
    But we can say, 'He robbed the house', can't we?
    You can, and people do, but the correct word is "burgled."

  6. 5jj's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: burgle or break in

    You rob a bank, store, train, but burgle a house.

  7. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: burgle or break in

    If you accept "rob" as suitable for a house (and I do -- I have no problem with the utterance of a homeowner who returns home and cries in dismay, "We've been robbed!" but clearly the others don't accept this) you need to say it "WAS robbed," not just "robbed."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: burgle or break in

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    If you accept "rob" as suitable for a house (and I do -- I have no problem with the utterance of a homeowner who returns home and cries in dismay, "We've been robbed!" but clearly the others don't accept this) you need to say it "WAS robbed," not just "robbed."
    I would say that the different utterances on returning home to find that there has been a burglary would depend on whether you referred to the building or to yourself:

    1) I've been robbed!
    2) The house has been burgled!

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