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  1. new2grammar's Avatar
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    #1

    up-to-date or up to date

    As an initial gesture, we are proud to provide you with two world class scientific journals that will provide you with the latest and up-to-date information that will boost your existing knowledge bank

    Please explain when to use up-to-date or up to date
    I need to know reneral rule

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: up-to-date or up to date

    Quote Originally Posted by new2grammar View Post
    As an initial gesture, we are proud to provide you with two world class scientific journals that will provide you with the latest and up-to-date information that will boost your existing knowledge bank

    Please explain when to use up-to-date or up to date
    I need to know reneral rule
    In your sentence use either "the latest information" or "up to date information" it isn't necessary to use both as they mean the same thing. The hyphens are not necessary in my opinion.

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    #3

    Re: up-to-date or up to date

    The general rule is to hyphenate when it is an adjective preceding the noun:
    "I have up-to-date information"
    and not to hyphenate when it is after:
    "My anti-virus is up to date"
    or
    "The last time this was up to date was in 2001."

    There is much inconsistency about hyphenating compound words, so you will see many variations.
    (Matching Mole, answering the same question here: http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=559153)

    Rover

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    #4

    Re: up-to-date or up to date

    up-to-date
    [more up–to–date; most up–to–date]
    1 : including the latest information
    ▪ up-to-date [=current] maps
    2 : based on or using the newest information, methods, etc.
    ▪ up-to-date styles ▪ up-to-date [=modern] methods
    Last edited by sunsunmoon; 24-May-2011 at 09:24.

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    #5

    Re: up-to-date or up to date

    Quote Originally Posted by new2grammar View Post
    As an initial gesture, we are proud to provide you with two world class scientific journals that will provide you with the latest and up-to-date information that will boost your existing knowledge bank

    Please explain when to use up-to-date or up to date
    I need to know reneral rule


    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) I agree that many Americans would prefer hyphens when this

    expression comes before the noun.

    (2) Furthermore, my dictionaries tell me that "up-to-date" means

    "the latest." So it might be helpful to remove "the latest" from your

    sentence. You do not want to say "...the latest and the latest

    information."

    (3) Even further, there are many (most?) Americans who would

    feel more comfortable with "world-class," when used in front of a noun.

    (4) Thus:


    As an initial gesture, we are pleased to provide you with

    two world-class scientific journals that will provide you with

    the latest information to boost your knowledge bank.


    NOTES: It might be a good idea to drop "up-to-date," and stay

    with the more formal word "latest"; it is not necessary to use the

    word "existing," for it is obvious that you referring to the reader's

    existing one. In modern American English, the rule seems to be:

    Drop all unnecessary words. Make your sentences short, clear, and

    snappy.


    Respectfully yours,


    James

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    #6

    Re: up-to-date or up to date

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) I agree that many Americans would prefer hyphens when this

    expression comes before the noun.
    Not only Americans

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