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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    Apparently, the higher the temperature, the more intense the flavor?

    Does "apparently" always have the meaning "seems like, looks like" not obvious? Does it mean "It seems that"? but for "apparent", it is two-meaningss like the following.
    1)It was apparent from her face that she was really upset- obvious.
    2)My parents were concerned at my apparent lack of enthusiasm for school- seeming.


    ex)In Chinese food, the idea is that it should be boiling hot, because that is crucial to its flavor, embodied in the phrase wok hei, which means the ‘breath’ or essence of the combination of tastes added by a hot wok. In 2005 Belgian researchers at Leuven University confirmed just how the link between temperature and taste works. They identified microscopic channels in our taste buds, which seem to respond differently at different temperatures. Apparently, the higher the temperature, the more intense the flavor. This is why ice cream does not taste that sweet straight from the fridge, which is why ice cream makers add stacks of sugar―as you can tell all too clearly when ice cream melts. In a similar way, some bitter tastes, like tea, taste better when hot because they are more intense.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Apparently, the higher the temperature, the more intense the flavor?

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Does "apparently" always have the meaning "seems like, looks like" not obvious?
    It can also mean ''from what I've heard'.

    I have just spoken to Mary. Apparently (= Mary told me) a teacher at her daughter's school has run away with a pupil.

    1)It was apparent from her face that she was really upset- obvious. Yes. In this meaning, 'apparent' rarely comes directly before the noun
    2)My parents were concerned at my apparent lack of enthusiasm for school- seeming. Yes. In this meaning, apparent usually comes before the noun.
    5

  3. keannu's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Apparently, the higher the temperature, the more intense the flavor?

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    5
    What is the meaning in this case?

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Apparently, the higher the temperature, the more intense the flavor?

    Apparently = this is what we can learn from the research. It's the I've heard/been told idea.

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