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    #1

    "chill" and "chill out"

    (We) chilled


    chill - definition of chill by Macmillan Dictionary
    chill or chill out [intransitive] informal
    to relax and stop being angry or nervous, or to spend time relaxing
    I’m just going to chill this weekend.


    Do you say "chill" and "chill out" equally often?


  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "chill" and "chill out"

    Quote Originally Posted by sunsunmoon View Post
    (We) chilled


    chill - definition of chill by Macmillan Dictionary
    chill or chill out [intransitive] informal
    to relax and stop being angry or nervous, or to spend time relaxing
    I’m just going to chill this weekend.


    Do you say "chill" and "chill out" equally often?
    I never say either, nor does anybody I know.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "chill" and "chill out"

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I never say either, nor does anybody I know.
    Neither do I. My son and his friends do, with 'chill' occusrring more often than 'chill out'.

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    #4

    Re: "chill" and "chill out"

    There is also a slang portmanteau, "chillax," a combination of chill and relax.

    Said to someone who is getting excited or agitated.

  3. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "chill" and "chill out"

    I guess "chill" and "chill out" are more common in AmE, as I use them often (and interchangeably). Actually, I should say that Mr. Ouisch uses them when talking to me (he uses "chillax" as well)....as if I, the very paragon of patience and calm ever get agitated enough to require such an admonition.

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    #6

    Re: "chill" and "chill out"

    I plead guilty to using both.

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: "chill" and "chill out"

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    I plead guilty to using both.
    Oh, the youngsters of today.

    Sigh.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: "chill" and "chill out"

    I would, and do, use both. However, after reflection, I think I use them in slightly different ways.

    I would say that I was "chilling out" if I was having a nice relaxing evening on the sofa with a glass of wine and a good movie.

    I would probably use "Chill" as a request or an imperative to someone who was agitated or over-excited:

    - Ooooh oooh oooh, I'm going on holiday. It's going to be fantastic. I'm going to do lots of watersports and get a tan and meet lots of boys and drink everything in sight......

    - OK. Chill! (ie OK, I get the picture. Now please calm down!)

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