Results 1 to 10 of 10
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 2,332
    #1

    discipline/disciplinary master

    Do native speakers say 'discipline master' or 'disciplinary master'?

    Thanks.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,479
    #2

    Re: discipline/disciplinary master

    This native speaker has never heard of, let alone used, either of these terms.

    We don't have them in the UK.

    Did you mean disciplinary matter? We do say that.

    Rover

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,864
    #3

    Re: discipline/disciplinary master

    I haven't either, and the only context I can think of where it might be used is probably unsuitable.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 2,332
    #4

    Re: discipline/disciplinary master

    Thanks, Rover and Tdol.

    In my country, a 'discipline/disciplinary master' is a teacher who is in charge of the discipline of students in a school. So, if a student has done anything that is an offence, for example, s/he is referred to that teacher, who will decide what to do with the errant student.

    I would like to know the term used by native speakers.

    Thanks.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,615
    #5

    Re: discipline/disciplinary master

    Quote Originally Posted by Tan Elaine View Post
    Thanks, Rover and Tdol.

    In my country, a 'discipline/disciplinary master' is a teacher who is in charge of the discipline of students in a school. So, if a student has done anything that is an offence, for example, s/he is referred to that teacher, who will decide what to do with the errant student.

    I would like to know the term used by native speakers.

    Thanks.
    We don't have a term for it.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 2,332
    #6

    Re: discipline/disciplinary master

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    We don't have a term for it.
    Thanks, Bhaisahab.

    If so, how do native speakers refer to such a teacher? Or is there no teacher in the school who is in charge of discipline of students?

  2. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #7

    Re: discipline/disciplinary master

    Quote Originally Posted by Tan Elaine View Post
    Thanks, Bhaisahab.

    If so, how do native speakers refer to such a teacher? Or is there no teacher in the school who is in charge of discipline of students?
    I suggest you might be a native speaker of Hong Kong English, Tan Elaine. Native British English speakers generally don't ask how native British English speakers speak.
    Be that as it may, I've never heard the term either. The person responsible for ultimate discipline in a school is the Head Teacher or Head Master, or perhaps the Deputy Head if s/he has a more sadistic streak than the Head Master, and assuming that the Head Master is willing to delegate this responsibility.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Vietnamese
      • Home Country:
      • Vietnam
      • Current Location:
      • Vietnam

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 472
    #8

    Re: discipline/disciplinary master

    If there is no corresponding term in English, do we have to use the original word to express that term? For example, in my country we have a very special kind of cake that doesn't belong to any other cultures. It is made from glutinous rice, green bean, fat meat ... plus a special way to blend them together... We don't have a corresponding term for that kind of cake in English speaking countries even maybe in any other countries, so we call it as it is most likely in Vietnamese. That is Chung Cake ("Chưng" or "Bánh Chưng" in Vietnamese). It seems to be called as a particular name.
    I think the ThreadStarter should do the same. Maybe many English speaker don't know what it is but once they understand (after you explain it means a teacher who ...), they can easily "update" their vocabulary with that term! I don't know if my idea is somewhat so stupid! Please don't laugh at me! :)

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,615
    #9

    Re: discipline/disciplinary master

    Quote Originally Posted by crazYgeeK View Post
    If there is no corresponding term in English, do we have to use the original word to express that term? For example, in my country we have a very special kind of cake that doesn't belong to any other cultures. It is made from glutinous rice, green bean, fat meat ... plus a special way to blend them together... We don't have a corresponding term for that kind of cake in English speaking countries even maybe in any other countries, so we call it as it is most likely in Vietnamese. That is Chung Cake ("Chưng" or "Bánh Chưng" in Vietnamese). It seems to be called as a particular name.
    I think the ThreadStarter should do the same. Maybe many English speaker don't know what it is but once they understand (after you explain it means a teacher who ...), they can easily "update" their vocabulary with that term! I don't know if my idea is somewhat so stupid! Please don't laugh at me! :)
    Your idea is not stupid at all, many terms from other languages are adopted into English. The difference here is that Tan Elaine speaks another form of English, not another language.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,864
    #10

    Re: discipline/disciplinary master

    Such questions of discipline would be referred to heads of year, or the management like the head of school- there's no specialist post that I know of for this.

Similar Threads

  1. [Vocabulary] discipline
    By uktous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 17-Nov-2009, 08:59
  2. discipline as
    By azz in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 25-Aug-2009, 22:48
  3. [General] a discipline fetished by the right
    By thedaffodils in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-Jul-2008, 06:36
  4. Discipline for Dummies
    By Cutetwirler in forum Teaching English
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 02-Oct-2007, 07:57
  5. Parents' discipline?
    By Joe in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 28-Aug-2004, 10:26

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •