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    #1

    enlisted / enlisted for national service

    In Singapore, a male citizen is called up for national service in the army soon after he has completed his A levels or polytechnic education.

    Can I say that the person involved has been enlisted when he is called up for national service? Or should I say "The person involved has been enlisted for national service"? In other words, have I to add the phrase 'for national service'?

    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: enlisted / enlisted for national service

    Enlist means ‘enroll in military’ etc. So I think ‘The person involved has been enlisted’ should be enough.



    I don't think that you should add the phrase 'for national service'.

  1. Route21's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: enlisted / enlisted for national service

    Hi Tan Elaine

    As a NES, but not a teacher, I support MN's assertion that, in your particular example (with the use of the term: "has been enlisted" - which implies compulsion), "for national service" could be reasonably be assumed.

    There could be, however, other nuances to the word "enlist", that may need to be taken into account in other situations, as per the following reference:
    Enlist: - definition of Enlist: by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.
    vb
    1.
    (Military) to enter or persuade to enter into an engagement to serve in the armed forces
    2. (tr) to engage or secure (a person, his services, or his support) for a venture, cause, etc.
    3. (intr; foll by in) to enter into or join an enterprise, cause, etc.

    Regards
    R21

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    #4

    Re: enlisted / enlisted for national service

    The normal expression in Britain, when we had National Service (or, in war-time, the Call-Up [conscription]), was simply "be called up":

    Fred is expecting to be called up any day now.

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    #5

    Re: enlisted / enlisted for national service

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    The normal expression in Britain, when we had National Service (or, in war-time, the Call-Up [conscription]), was simply "be called up":

    Fred is expecting to be called up any day now.
    Thanks, Fivejedjon.

    Would it be wrong if I say "Fred is expecting to be called up for National Service any day now"? Would I be seen as uneducated?
    Last edited by Tan Elaine; 02-Jun-2011 at 13:46.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: enlisted / enlisted for national service

    Quote Originally Posted by Tan Elaine View Post
    Would it be wrong if I say "Fred is expecting to be called up for National Service any day now"? Would I be seen as uneducated.
    That would be normal today, in my opinion. As we haven't had National Service in England for over fifty years, "Fred is expecting to be called up" might well not be understood in the way that the expression was used when I was young. Fred is presumably a citizen of a country where conscription still exists, and your sentence makes the meaning clear.

    Even back when we had it, I don't think your sentence would have been considered uneducated. To the contrary, it might have been considered a little formal.

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: enlisted / enlisted for national service

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    The normal expression in Britain, when we had National Service (or, in war-time, the Call-Up [conscription]), was simply "be called up":

    Fred is expecting to be called up any day now.
    And when people do it of their own free will, they 'sign up'. 'Call-up' can behave as an adjective. My brother 'got his call-up papers'.

    b

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    #8

    Re: enlisted / enlisted for national service

    In the US, when we had conscription, the person was "drafted." One who volunteers, "enlists."

  6. 5jj's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: enlisted / enlisted for national service

    Quote Originally Posted by riquecohen View Post
    In the US, when we had conscription, the person was "drafted." One who volunteers, "enlists."
    On our side of the pond, we understand those words, but we don't normally use them in that sense.

    I am not sure whether this is still true, but when my father was in the Royal Navy (1940s to 1960s) he was often drafted; he received orders to join a new ship/establishment. I don't even know now whether he was 'drafted' or 'draughted'.

    ps. http://www.rncom.mod.uk/Family_Wellb.../Drafting.aspx
    Last edited by 5jj; 02-Jun-2011 at 14:02. Reason: ps added

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    #10

    Re: enlisted / enlisted for national service

    Go for the more complex and counter-intuitive spelling - it usually works (this side of the Pond at least)

    b

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