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  1. moqaddas's Avatar
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    #1

    youngest,eldest and oldest

    youngest(smallest in relative)
    Sana is youngest of three sister.
    if I want to say
    Sana is youngest in my family or Sana is youngest of/in siblings.
    Are these correct to say like this?
    Same problem I am having with eldest(oldest in relatives) and oldest (old in age )If there is any mistake to get the meaning of them ,Please tell me regarding?

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    #2

    Re: youngest,eldest and oldest

    Interestingly, 'eldest', whether as an adjective or as an adjectival noun, is rather more common than 'oldest' in BrE (as is 'elder' vis-a-vis 'older') but refers exclusively to family members/relations. Thus we can say

    His eldest sister died ten years ago.
    My eldest (=eldest child) lives in Wales.
    She's the eldest (=eldest person) in her family.

    but not

    *This is the eldest tree in England.

    or

    *He is the eldest man in the world.

    (both of the above requiring 'oldest').

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    #3

    Re: youngest,eldest and oldest

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    Gil
    hello...i would like to ask about the below..
    as i know, the word "small" also means "very young & not matured"
    so how about if i say "he is the smallest pianist in the world" (meaning he is the youngest pianist in the world), is it correct? thank you!

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: youngest,eldest and oldest

    Quote Originally Posted by fangyunying View Post
    hello...i would like to ask about the below..
    as i know, the word "small" also means "very young & not matured"
    so how about if i say "he is the smallest pianist in the world" (meaning he is the youngest pianist in the world), is it correct? thank you!
    Welcome to the forums.

    Please try to use proper English in here, including correct capitalization.

    Your understanding of "small" does not match my understanding. My daughter had a friend who was very, very small due to a heart condition, but she was not particularly young despite being small, and she was as mature as any other child of her age. Small does NOT equal immature or not mature.
    Last edited by Barb_D; 13-Jun-2011 at 06:08.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: youngest,eldest and oldest

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    So, you could say that your sister is the eldest in your family but not that she is the eldest member of her church?
    That is correct.

    Do you have church elders in your church?
    Some churches have elders - who may be comparatively young.
    5

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    #6

    Re: youngest,eldest and oldest

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    No. It means that he is shorter than any other pianist. A is the tallest pianist at seven feet and B is the smallest at two feet.
    thanks. it's kinda confusing. as small can be defined as "very young, not matured", but thenwhen i add "est" (superlative) become "smallest" and the meaning of "smallest" is different after i add "est"

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: youngest,eldest and oldest

    Quote Originally Posted by fangyunying View Post
    tThanks. it's kinda of confusing. as "small" can be defined as "very young, not matured", but thenwhen i I add "est" (superlative) it become "smallest" and the meaning of "smallest" is different after i I add "est"
    'Small' does not normally mean 'very young, not matured' unless the context makes it very clear. See Barb_D's post.

    When we say, 'travelling with small children can be a pain', we are probably thinking as much of the size as the age. It is always safer to use 'young' if you are thinking of the age.

    Please try to use capital letters where appropriate.

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    #8

    Re: youngest,eldest and oldest

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Welcome to the forums.

    Please try to use proper English in here, including correct capitalization.

    Your understanding of "small" does not match my understanding. My daughter had a friend who was very, very small due to a heart condition, but she was not particularly young despite being small, and she was as mature as any other child of her age. Small does NOT equal immature or not mature.
    Thanks for the reminder. I search online and it gives me the definition of "small" as above. And may i know which part of my English that is seemed to be "improper"? Sorry,i am a learner here.

  5. 5jj's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: youngest,eldest and oldest

    Quote Originally Posted by fangyunying View Post
    Thanks for the reminder. I search online and it gives me the definition of "small" as above.
    'Small' can be used with this meaning in certain contexts, but it is generally used to refer to size. Please read posts # 7 and #10 again.

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    #10

    Re: youngest,eldest and oldest

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    So, you could say that your sister is the eldest in your family but not that she is the eldest member of her church? Do you have church elders in your church?
    We in Britain would not normally speak of being the 'eldest member' of a church (although that is probably just as much for cultural as for linguistic reasons!) That said, however, the collocation is perfectly comprehensible.

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