Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. b.a.d.'s Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Nov 2008
    • Posts: 82
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    around and round

    Hi! Is it ok for informal speech to replace around with round and vice versa in phrasal verbs like that:

    no fooling 'round (instead of 'fooling around')
    come 'round (instead of 'come around')

    ?

    Thanks

  2. AlexAD's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Belarus
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2011
    • Posts: 668
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: around and round

    I am not a teacher nor a native speaker.

    Here is the excerpt from the OALD, 8th edition:

    Around and round can often be used with the same meaning in BrE, though around is more formal:

    1. The earth goes round/around the sun.
    2. They live round/around the corner.
    3. We travelled round/around India.
    4. She turned round/around when I came in.

    In NAmE only around can be used in these meanings.

    Around, round and about can also sometimes be used with the same meaning in BrE.

    1. The kids were running around/round/about outside.
    2. I've been waiting around/round/about to see her all day.

    In NAmE only around can be used in these meanings.

    About or around can be used in both BrE and NAmE to mean 'approximately': We left around/about 8 o'clock.

    I hope, this will help you.

    P.S. Dear moderators, could you please add a pop-up tip for the contraction of NAmE if you can.

    Thanks, Alex.
    Last edited by AlexAD; 08-Jun-2011 at 10:43.

  3. b.a.d.'s Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Nov 2008
    • Posts: 82
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: around and round

    Well, thanks a lot, pal ))) But I'd better like to know what native speakers think about whether there's principal difference between 'around' and 'round' in informal speech.
    Thanks

  4. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,135
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: around and round

    Quote Originally Posted by b.a.d. View Post
    I'd better like to rather know what native speakers think about whether there's principal a real difference between 'around' and 'round' in informal speech.
    Well, I am a native speaker of BrE, and I agree with the editors of the ALD, who are also native speakers.

    Note that we do not write 'round. Round is a word in its own right in modern English, not a short form of around.

  5. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,135
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: around and round

    @ b.a.d.

    Be careful with "Well, thanks a lot, pal". It can give the impression that you are implying, "Thanks for nothing" = "That was no help".

  6. AlexAD's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Belarus
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2011
    • Posts: 668
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: around and round

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    @ b.a.d.

    Be careful with "Well, thanks a lot, pal". It can give the impression that you are implying, "Thanks for nothing" = "That was no help".
    5jdjon, is it because of the leading well? Otherwise I would not be sensible untill I have heard this being told with irony in a voice.

    I would be grateful if you would correct my grammar in the post.

    Thanks, Alex.

  7. SirGod's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Romanian
      • Home Country:
      • Romania
      • Current Location:
      • Romania

    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 424
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: around and round

    *Not a teacher

    I avoid using the structure "thanks a lot" which, as fivejedjon said, can imply irony. Example:

    F: Hey, I have bad news and good news.
    B: Tell me both in one sentence.
    F: Your car's airbags work!
    B: Great, thanks a lot, now I have to go to work on foot.

  8. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,135
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #8

    Re: around and round

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexAD View Post
    5jdjon, is it because of the leading well? Otherwise I would not be sensible untill I have heard this being told with irony in a voice.
    The 'well' and the 'pal' increase the chance of sarcasm. Just 'Thanks a lot' is not sarcastic - unless the intonation tells us that it is .

    Otherwise I would not be sensible untill I have heard this being told with irony in a voice.

    I think you mean: I would not be aware of this unless I could detect irony in the tone .

    In modern English, sensible normally means "able to make good judgements based on reason and experience rather than emotion; practical". (ALD)

  9. AlexAD's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Belarus
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2011
    • Posts: 668
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #9

    Re: around and round

    I agree it can. And sometimes it's quite obvious to see.
    But at the same time how would you express your booming feelings if you didn't use 'Thanks, a lot. Thank you very much. et cetera?

    I think that depends on how the person is feeling about it

  10. AlexAD's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Belarus
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2011
    • Posts: 668
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #10

    Re: around and round

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    Otherwise I would not be sensible untill I have heard this being told with irony in a voice.

    I think you mean: I would not be aware of this unless I could detect irony in the tone .

    In modern English, sensible normally means "able to make good judgements based on reason and experience rather than emotion; practical". (ALD)
    Yes, 5jdjon, I do. Thank you for your correction. I used 'sensible' in the meaning of 'aware of sth' that is under the point #3 in the OALD. Here, they give us an example, 'I am sensible of the fact that mathematics is not a popular subject'. Now, I'll rather use your variant.

    Thanks, Alex.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. I don't understand "play round and round"
    By yuyu0615 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-Dec-2010, 01:57
  2. [General] round up (v)/ expired/ round-up (n)/ vulture/ a trifle..
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-Sep-2009, 09:20
  3. around and round
    By jiang in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 02-Dec-2006, 09:27
  4. round and round red robin
    By carla guaraldi in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-Aug-2005, 00:08
  5. fashions go round and round ( correct)
    By deer in forum Editing & Writing Topics
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 21-Nov-2004, 23:04

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •