Results 1 to 7 of 7
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Egypt
      • Current Location:
      • Egypt

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 1,050
    #1

    "docket ending" / versus

    Dear all,

    In a courtroom, the judge often says the term "Docket ending" followed by a certain number ... Is "docket ending" a whole expression or "ending" here mean whta?

    Second, when the judge says the word "versus" as in:

    "The State of California versus Elaine Bingum"

    Also if you kindly post any reference for "legal terms" or "court terms"

    Thanks a lot for you all.

  1. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #2

    Re: "docket ending" / versus

    Quote Originally Posted by maiabulela View Post
    "The State of California versus Elaine Bingum"
    The British and American legal systems are adverserial, that is one side is against the other. In very crude terms, the 'winners' are the ones who convince the judge/jury that they are telling the truth.

    In criminal trials, the prosecution is brought on behalf of the Queen in the United Kingdom, hence "R. v. Bingum" (= Regina [Latin for 'Queen'] versus [Latin for 'against] Bingum [the name of the person accused of the crime]). In the USA, the prosecution is brought on behalf of the federal or state governments, depending on the crime.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Egypt
      • Current Location:
      • Egypt

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 1,050
    #3

    Re: "docket ending" / versus

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    The British and American legal systems are adverserial, that is one side is against the other. In very crude terms, the 'winners' are the ones who convince the judge/jury that they are telling the truth.

    In criminal trials, the prosecution is brought on behalf of the Queen in the United Kingdom, hence "R. v. Bingum" (= Regina [Latin for 'Queen'] versus [Latin for 'against] Bingum [the name of the person accused of the crime]). In the USA, the prosecution is brought on behalf of the federal or state governments, depending on the crime.
    the prosecution is "the state attorney" in that case?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,310
    #4

    Re: "docket ending" / versus

    In the US, they are "district attorneys," who represent either the particular state (e.g. Pennsylvania) in state courts or the United States in federal courts.

    (Two separate people, that is. A state DA and a federal DA.)

  2. Ouisch's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 4,142
    #5

    Re: "docket ending" / versus

    Quote Originally Posted by maiabulela View Post
    Dear all,

    In a courtroom, the judge often says the term "Docket ending" followed by a certain number ... Is "docket ending" a whole expression or "ending" here mean whta?
    In the US, a "docket" is the list of cases a judge has on his or her agenda for that paricular day in the courtroom. Each individual case that is presented before the judge has a docket number. When the bailiff or court clerk announces a docket number, it references a specific case. For example, the clerk might announce to the court room (and the judge) prior to a case being heard "Your honor, this is Case Number 3029 on the Docket in the matter of Smith versus Jones."

    Second, when the judge says the word "versus" as in:

    "The State of California versus Elaine Bingum"
    In the US, if the crime being tried is not a civil matter - that is, one person suing another - it is usually put on trial as the citizens of that particular state (as the Plaintiff) versus the alleged criminal (as the Defendant). Aggressive crimes like robbery, rape, murder, etc, are considered to be crimes against the entire populace of the state. For example, Charles Manson was accused of murdering seven different people. When he was arrested and brought to trial, he was the Defendant, and the Plaintiff was the State of California (i.e. "The People of the State of California versus Charles Manson").

    Also if you kindly post any reference for "legal terms" or "court terms"

    Thanks a lot for you all.
    Legal terms are almost by definition made to be confusing, but this site might help you a bit regarding the basics of U.S. court room terminology.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Egypt
      • Current Location:
      • Egypt

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 1,050
    #6

    Re: "docket ending" / versus

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    In the US, a "docket" is the list of cases a judge has on his or her agenda for that paricular day in the courtroom. Each individual case that is presented before the judge has a docket number. When the bailiff or court clerk announces a docket number, it references a specific case. For example, the clerk might announce to the court room (and the judge) prior to a case being heard "Your honor, this is Case Number 3029 on the Docket in the matter of Smith versus Jones."



    In the US, if the crime being tried is not a civil matter - that is, one person suing another - it is usually put on trial as the citizens of that particular state (as the Plaintiff) versus the alleged criminal (as the Defendant). Aggressive crimes like robbery, rape, murder, etc, are considered to be crimes against the entire populace of the state. For example, Charles Manson was accused of murdering seven different people. When he was arrested and brought to trial, he was the Defendant, and the Plaintiff was the State of California (i.e. "The People of the State of California versus Charles Manson").



    Legal terms are almost by definition made to be confusing, but this site might help you a bit regarding the basics of U.S. court room terminology.
    I really can't thanks you enough! I totally got it.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Egypt
      • Current Location:
      • Egypt

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 1,050
    #7

    Re: "docket ending" / versus

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    In the US, a "docket" is the list of cases a judge has on his or her agenda for that paricular day in the courtroom. Each individual case that is presented before the judge has a docket number. When the bailiff or court clerk announces a docket number, it references a specific case. For example, the clerk might announce to the court room (and the judge) prior to a case being heard "Your honor, this is Case Number 3029 on the Docket in the matter of Smith versus Jones."



    In the US, if the crime being tried is not a civil matter - that is, one person suing another - it is usually put on trial as the citizens of that particular state (as the Plaintiff) versus the alleged criminal (as the Defendant). Aggressive crimes like robbery, rape, murder, etc, are considered to be crimes against the entire populace of the state. For example, Charles Manson was accused of murdering seven different people. When he was arrested and brought to trial, he was the Defendant, and the Plaintiff was the State of California (i.e. "The People of the State of California versus Charles Manson").



    Legal terms are almost by definition made to be confusing, but this site might help you a bit regarding the basics of U.S. court room terminology.
    Also, I put all the explanation you have kindly provided in my legal glossary

Similar Threads

  1. "point" versus "dot" ?
    By ph2004 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 29-Oct-2009, 14:27
  2. "Most of the time" versus "most of the times"
    By Anita B-S in forum English Idioms and Sayings
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-Feb-2009, 23:26
  3. [Idiom] When speaking: Bush's "Err..." versus My "Umm..."
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 18-Jan-2009, 14:15
  4. Grammar "related to" versus "relating to"
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 21-Jan-2004, 22:14

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •