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    #1

    may/might as well confess

    She may/might as well confess to the crime. We have all the evidence against her.

    Which word in bold should I use?

    Thanks.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: may/might as well confess

    Quote Originally Posted by Tan Elaine View Post
    She may/might as well confess to the crime. We have all the evidence against her.

    Which word in bold should I use?

    Thanks.
    Have a look at this:
    http://www.usingenglish.com/files/pd...ossibility.pdf

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    #3

    Re: may/might as well confess

    Thanks, Bhaisahab

    She may/might as well confess to the crime. We have all the evidence against her.

    After reading what you referred me to, can I conclude that I should use 'may' in the above sentence, as the next sentence states that we have all the evidence, implying that it is certain that she had committed the crime?

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: may/might as well confess

    The main problem with 'may' and 'might' is that the differences suggested by the writer of the article bhai linked to exist only for some native speakers. Different people think different things.

    1. For my ageing generation of speakers of BrE, 'might' serves as a past tense of 'may' in some circumstances:

    "I may come tomorrow".....He said that he might come the next day".


    It also serves to denote a more distant possibility then 'may':

    He may come tomorrow; it depends on how much time he has.
    He might come tomorrow, but I think he'll be too busy.

    2. Some people appear to use 'may' and 'might' with little difference in meaning.

    3. For some people, especially some speakers of AmE, 'may' hardly seems to exist; they use 'might' in all situations.

    This is not very helpful for learners, I am afraid, though context normally makes the intentions of the speaker fairly clear. If you are in doubt about which to use yourself, consider such alternatives as 'will possibly', 'will probably', is likely to', 'is unlikely to', etc.

    In my opinion, there is no significant difference between 'may as well' and 'might as well' for most speakers.
    Last edited by 5jj; 11-Jun-2011 at 20:20. Reason: typo

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