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    #1

    Arrow Underwater

    (Context: The current mortgage crisis where homeowners owe more than their houses are worth)

    "The house is underwater $100,000."

    Should I put "by" right after "underwater"?

  1. SanMar's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Underwater

    Quote Originally Posted by EverLivingPoet View Post
    (Context: The current mortgage crisis where homeowners owe more than their houses are worth)

    "The house is underwater $100,000."

    Should I put "by" right after "underwater"?
    I haven't heard underwater being used in this way before. Do you mean some kind of debt?

    Not a teacher.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Underwater

    I recommend that you do not use the expression at all. It sounds to me like the invention of some journalist who is trying to use vivid expressions

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    #4

    Re: Underwater

    I think in the United States, "underwater" means a house's market value has fallen below the purchase price of the house.

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    #5

    Re: Underwater

    Quote Originally Posted by EverLivingPoet View Post
    I think in the United States, "underwater" means a house's market value has fallen below the purchase price of the house.
    I think that when somebody explains that the word is not used in that way, you will come up with a link in which it is used that way.

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    #6

    Re: Underwater

    If sales could be "up 10%", and the price could be "down $100", then surely a house could be "underwater $100,000"?

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Underwater

    I recommend that you do not use the expression at all. It sounds to me like the invention of some journalist who is trying to use vivid expressions

  4. SanMar's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Underwater

    It may be some "creative" variation of drowning in debt.


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    #9

    Re: Underwater

    But, using the traditional meaning of "water", a stone could be "underwater (by) several feet"?

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    #10

    Re: Underwater

    Quote Originally Posted by EverLivingPoet View Post
    But, using the traditional meaning of "water", a stone could be "underwater (by) several feet"?
    There being millions of stones on the beds of rivers, seas, lakes and oceans, you are unlikely to want to say such a thing.

    You might, describing a valley in which a reservoir has been created, say "The village is now a hundred feet/metres under water". And, before you ask, some people might write 'underwater' as one word, and no, the difference isn't particularly important.

    And no, we wouldn't normally say that something is underwater by several feet, but yes, there are probably some people who might say that.

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