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    #1

    "provisions" - only for legal documents?

    Hi, I have a question about the word “provision”.

    The OALD (Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary) says (as the 4th meaning of the word) it means “a condition or an arrangement in a legal document”.


    How about conditions described in guidelines or guidance issued by the government/universities, and company SOPs (standard operating procedures)?
    Is it incorrect to call them “provisions”? If so, what do you call them instead? Just “conditions”?

    Example 1 (Guidelines for Safeguarding Information by Brown University):
    3.2.1 Handling Information
    Faculty, staff and students should exercise care and judgment to ensure adequate protection of Brown sensitive information.

    Example 2 (Guidance for Industry - Medical Device Tracking; Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff):
    FDA has discretion on whether to order tracking for devices that meet the statutory requirements or to release devices from tracking based on additional guidance factors and other relevant information that comes to the agency’s attention.

    Example 3 (company SOP):
    1. All new employees are assigned to a specific work group under the guidance of the production supervisor or case manager.

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    #2

    Re: "provisions" - only for legal documents?

    Quote Originally Posted by pinkie9 View Post
    Hi, I have a question about the word “provision”.

    The OALD (Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary) says (as the 4th meaning of the word) it means “a condition or an arrangement in a legal document”.


    How about conditions described in guidelines or guidance issued by the government/universities, and company SOPs (standard operating procedures)?
    Is it incorrect to call them “provisions”? If so, what do you call them instead? Just “conditions”?

    Example 1 (Guidelines for Safeguarding Information by Brown University):
    3.2.1 Handling Information
    Faculty, staff and students should exercise care and judgment to ensure adequate protection of Brown sensitive information.

    Example 2 (Guidance for Industry - Medical Device Tracking; Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff):
    FDA has discretion on whether to order tracking for devices that meet the statutory requirements or to release devices from tracking based on additional guidance factors and other relevant information that comes to the agency’s attention.

    Example 3 (company SOP):
    1. All new employees are assigned to a specific work group under the guidance of the production supervisor or case manager.
    Not a teacher only a native.

    I wouldn't call the examples you gave 'provisions'. As your dictionary definition states, 'provisions' suggest there or certain conditions or arrangements, which your examples lack.

    With reference to your title, 'provisions' aren't limited to legal documents and not all legal documents have 'provisions'.

    A teacher may be able to explain this better, if you are still unsure please say so.

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    #3

    Re: "provisions" - only for legal documents?

    I could imagine saying "there is a provision in the company handbook which prohibits..." even though it's not a "legal" document.

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    #4

    Re: "provisions" - only for legal documents?

    Thank you.
    I'm waiting for more replies.

    If they are not called "provisions", what do you call them instead?
    Last edited by pinkie9; 19-Jun-2011 at 06:34.

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    #5

    Re: "provisions" - only for legal documents?

    I'm still waiting for replies.

    If they are not called "provisions", what do you call them instead?

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    #6

    Re: "provisions" - only for legal documents?

    I would simply use guidelines and procedures.

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    #7

    Re: "provisions" - only for legal documents?

    Thank you.

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