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    • Join Date: Sep 2005
    • Posts: 9
    #1

    Elusive Infix

    Apparantly there is one (maybe?) word in the english language that uses an infix.

    There are lots of slang or made up words but im curious if there is in fact a real english word that utilizes the infix.

    Any help will be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks!


    • Join Date: Sep 2005
    • Posts: 9
    #2

    Re: Elusive Infix

    any thoughts to this at all?

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #3


    • Join Date: Sep 2005
    • Posts: 9
    #4

    Re: Elusive Infix

    i have been to that site, as well as many others.

    basically i need the answer to this question.

    "What is the one word in the english language that has an infix?"

    so far no one seems to have a clue :(.

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #5

    Re: Elusive Infix

    What if it means, look for a word that houses the letters "-infix-"?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,861
    #6

    Re: Elusive Infix

    It doesn't look like it: http://www.onelook.com/?w=*infix*&ls=a
    The only infixes I know are 'bloody' and 'f**king'.


    • Join Date: Sep 2005
    • Posts: 9
    #7

    Re: Elusive Infix

    At first i assumed the professor meant that, so all the classics like eduMAcation and absoFREAKINGlutely and others came to mind, but he said "The one". Since those are all so common in slang i feel safe to assume there is either "One" word or a trick question of sorts.

    • Member Info
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      • Current Location:
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    #8

    Re: Elusive Infix

    This text makes an interesting point: run->ran or man->men are infixes:
    http://www.csun.edu/english/english302/morph.pdf
    If adding -ed is a suffix, then internal changes to denote tense or plurality are, logically, infixes. However, this doesn't answer your professor's question as it suggests that a small group of words have infixes, when showing tense or number.
    Last edited by Tdol; 20-Sep-2005 at 17:10.


    • Join Date: Sep 2005
    • Posts: 9
    #9

    Re: Elusive Infix

    Very interesting, definately gives me a little more angle in my search.

    much appreciated and once the professor reveals the answer to his question i will be sure to post here.

    Thanks!

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,861
    #10

    Re: Elusive Infix

    Please do- I'm very interested in his answer.

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