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    #1

    Has been

    Hi,
    I am wondering if the following sentences are correct?
    His kindness has been shown unequivocally throughout the novel.
    His kindness has been unequivocally shown throughout the novel.
    His kindness has unequivocally been shown throughout the novel.

    I have a feeling its got to do with the grammar rule of not splitting verbs(infinitive+verb) apart but I am not 100% sure.
    Thanks!

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    #2

    Re: Has been

    That grammar rule is nonsense. Please forget it.

  1. suprunp's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Has been

    Quote Originally Posted by Mar Rojo View Post
    That grammar rule is nonsense. Please forget it.
    May I ask you whether what you are saying here is that all these three sentences are correct and sound good?

    I'm asking this because Michael Swan in his book Practical English Usage, third edition in entry 24 suggests that:

    "Adverbs that usually go in mid-position: adverbs of [...] certainty (e.g. probably, definitely).
    Mid-position adverbs usually go before one-part verbs, after auxiliary verbs, and after am/are/is/was/were."

    "When there are two or more auxiliaries, the adverb usually goes after the first."

    The train has obviously been delayed.

    You have definitely been working too hard.

    Thanks.

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    #4

    Re: Has been

    This one has a so called split infinitive, but is wholly correct usage.

    His kindness has been unequivocally shown throughout the novel.
    All three sentences are grammatically correct.

  2. suprunp's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Has been

    Quote Originally Posted by Mar Rojo View Post
    This one has a so called split infinitive, but is wholly correct usage.
    Would you be so kind to elaborate this point?

    Split infinitive
    (in English grammar) an infinitive used with another word between to (the infinitive marker) and the verb itself, as in I want to really finish it this time
    Collins English Dictionary. 8th Edition

    Where is a 'split infinitive' in this sentence?

    His kindness has unequivocally been shown throughout the novel.

    Thanks.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Has been

    Quote Originally Posted by suprunp View Post
    Would you be so kind to elaborate this point?

    Split infinitive
    (in English grammar) an infinitive used with another word between to (the infinitive marker) and the verb itself, as in I want to really finish it this time
    Collins English Dictionary. 8th Edition

    Where is a 'split infinitive' in this sentence?

    His kindness has unequivocally been shown throughout the novel.

    Thanks.
    There is no "split infinitive" there. However, it is an odd sentence not least the use of the present perfect.

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    #7

    Re: Has been

    Quote Originally Posted by kazewolf View Post
    Hi,
    I am wondering if the following sentences are correct?
    His kindness has been shown unequivocally throughout the novel.
    His kindness has been unequivocally shown throughout the novel.
    His kindness has unequivocally been shown throughout the novel.

    I have a feeling its got to do with the grammar rule of not splitting verbs(infinitive+verb) apart but I am not 100% sure.
    Thanks!

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Kazewolf:


    (1) As the moderator told us, there is no infinitive in your sentences.

    (2) The other posters have also given us very helpful advice.

    (3) May I give my two cents?

    (4) I think that the question is: where is the best place to put the

    adverb? And native speakers do not always agree where to put an adverb.

    (5) First, "unequivocally" is an adverb of manner. It answers the

    question: how? It means "there is no doubt."

    His kindness has been shown unequivocally throughout the novel.

    (a) I think that most people would find this to be fine.

    (b) Some books say that if you put it at the end like that, it means

    that "unequivocally" is absolutely necessary to show what meaning

    you wish to express. That is, if you do not include the word, then

    your sentence is not expressing what you really want. Some (not all)

    books say that when you put the adverb at the end like that, the adverb

    is really a complement. That is, it "completes" your meaning.

    His kindness has been unequivocally shown throughout the novel.

    (a) Some people say that if you put it there, the manner adverb

    "unequivocally" is modifying "shown." That is, "shown" in a way that

    leaves no doubt.

    His kindness has unequivocally been shown throughout the novel.

    (a) Of course, there are some (many?) native speakers who would find

    this sentence fine, too.

    (b) Some people believe that the manner adverb is in the "wrong"

    position. They believe that it belongs in front of "shown."

    BUT look at this sentence:

    His kindness has probably been appreciated by many people.

    "Probably" is NOT a manner adverb. It does not modify any verb.

    It modifies the whole sentence. It means:

    Probably, his kindness has been appreciated by many people./ It is
    probable that his kindness has been appreciated by many people.

    If an adverb refers to the whole sentence, then we can follow the rule

    and place it after the first auxiliary.


    James

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Has been

    Quote Originally Posted by kazewolf View Post
    Hi,
    I am wondering if the following sentences are correct?
    His kindness has been shown unequivocally throughout the novel.
    His kindness has been unequivocally shown throughout the novel.
    His kindness has unequivocally been shown throughout the novel.

    I have a feeling its got to do with the grammar rule of not splitting verbs(infinitive+verb) apart but I am not 100% sure.
    Thanks!
    The third is much less common, and I don't like it much.
    The adverb generally comes either directly before, or directly after the past participle in constructions like this - here "shown".
    (We also don't write "unequivocally has been shown" often either; it's probably about as common as 3. ie. rare.)

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    #9

    Re: Has been

    Alright, thanks guys.

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