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    #1

    break in

    As for train, what is the difference between break and break in? By the way ,what's the meaning of "in " here? Thanks a lot!

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: break in

    Quote Originally Posted by notletrest View Post
    As for train, what is the difference between break and break in? By the way ,what's the meaning of "in " here? Thanks a lot!
    I don't know what either "break" or "break in" would have to do with a train. Can you explain please?

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    #3

    Re: break in

    N.A.T.

    I don't understand why anyone would break in a train either.
    Are you referring to a money train? I don't know about the correct term, but there was a very spectacular crime in the UK in the 1960's.

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    #4

    Re: break in

    To train someone is also to break them in, in the early stages of the training.

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    #5

    Re: break in

    While your question isn't very clear, I think you might find your answer here. break-in - Definition of break-in at YourDictionary.com

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    #6

    Re: break in

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I don't know what either "break" or "break in" would have to do with a train. Can you explain please?
    To my surprise ,an Englishman should say "to break or break in " and "to train" are different pairs of shoes. As long as you open "The Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English" by " Oxford University Press 1963" and look up "break" at page 114 , you wil l read "train or disiplline : break a horse (in)". In mine aove , I only omitted all the symbols of to before infinitives for short.
    Thanks for your concern!

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    #7

    Re: break in

    You can also break a pair of shoes in, which has nothing to do with train. The phrasal verb can also mean "familiarise", "accustom", and "tame", as with a wild horse.

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    #8

    Re: break in

    Quote Originally Posted by notletrest View Post
    To my surprise ,an Englishman should say "to break or break in " and "to train" are different pairs of shoes. As long as you open "The Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English" by " Oxford University Press 1963" and look up "break" at page 114 , you wil l read "train or disiplline : break a horse (in)". In mine aove , I only omitted all the symbols of to before infinitives for short.
    Thanks for your concern!
    To my surprise ,an Englishman should say "to break or break in " and "to train" are different pairs of shoes. As long as you open "The Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English" by " Oxford University Press 1963" and look up "break" at page 114 , you wil l read "train or disiplline : break a horse (in)". In mine above , I only omitted all the symbols of to before infinitives for short.
    Thanks for your concern![/

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: break in

    Quote Originally Posted by notletrest View Post
    To my surprise ,an Englishman should say "to break or break in " and "to train" are different pairs of shoes. As long as you open "The Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English" by " Oxford University Press 1963" and look up "break" at page 114 , you wil l read "train or disiplline : break a horse (in)". In mine above , I only omitted all the symbols of to before infinitives for short.
    Thanks for your concern![/
    Now I'm confused by the use of "different pairs of shoes" and can't work out the relevance!!

    In the hopes that I've vaguely got the point of the question, the phrasal verb "to break in" when referring to horses does mean to take a previously untamed horse and start to train it so that it's happy to be ridden.

    We also "break in" a pair of shoes, wearing them a few times and walking around the house or the local area to help to stretch the material and make the shoes more comfortable before wearing them for an extended period. Ah, have I just worked out the relevance of "different pairs of shoes".

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    #10

    Re: break in

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Now I'm confused by the use of "different pairs of shoes" and can't work out the relevance!!

    In the hopes that I've vaguely got the point of the question, the phrasal verb "to break in" when referring to horses does mean to take a previously untamed horse and start to train it so that it's happy to be ridden.

    We also "break in" a pair of shoes, wearing them a few times and walking around the house or the local area to help to stretch the material and make the shoes more comfortable before wearing them for an extended period. Ah, have I just worked out the relevance of "different pairs of shoes".
    Mr emsr2d2 is really a man of humour. I don't know whether I can creatively use the English proverb "That's another pair of shoes." It is because you said you couldn't see the relevance of "train ,break and break in " in your first answer. That is to say to train is one thing , to break is another and to break in is anther pair of shoes,too. I think so. In order to sum up the above meaning I changed the proverb form into "they are differnt pairs of shoes to express your meaning in another way. From your second answer I can see my usage of the proverb is wrong. Is it so?
    I am waiting for you sincerely.

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