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    #1

    nor

    Hi,

    - The snow fell nor did it cease to fall. *Why this sentence is composed like this? Could somebody please point out the part "nor did it cease"?

    Thanks,
    Joe

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    #2

    Re: nor

    You would have to ask the writer why he or she composed a sentence in this way. It's a grammatically correct but very uncommon way to say,

    "The snow kept falling."

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    #3

    Re: nor

    Quote Originally Posted by bwkcaj_ca View Post
    You would have to ask the writer why he or she composed a sentence in this way. It's a grammatically correct but very uncommon way to say,

    "The snow kept falling."
    As much as I can remember, that's Tolstoy. I will call him tomorrow for a help.

    And why isn't it "nor it did cease"?

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    #4

    Re: nor

    Quote Originally Posted by joeoct View Post
    Hi,

    - The snow fell nor did it cease to fall. *Why this sentence is composed like this? Could somebody please point out the part "nor did it cease"?

    Thanks,
    Joe

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Joe:

    (1) The teacher has already given you the answer.

    (2) May I just add a few points?

    (a) One very good grammar book says that "nor" in sentences

    such as yours really means "and" + "not."

    (i) So I guess we could rewrite it as:

    The snow fell, and it did not cease to fall.

    (ii) I think that "The snow fell nor did it cease to fall" is more

    elegant, don't you?

    (iii) If I understand my books correctly, it could also be written:

    The snow fell. Nor did it cease to fall.

    (3) There is something in English (and probably in other languages, too)

    called "inversion." That is, the words are NOT in regular order. One book

    explains that if a sentence begins with a negative-like word, inversion

    is the rule:

    NEVER have I seen such a ghastly [horrible] sight.

    ONLY THEN did I realize how lucky I was.

    That's why you need to invert subject and verb in:

    NOR did it cease to fall.


    Sincerely,


    James


    Credits: (a) A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language.

    (b) The Oxford Dictionary of English Grammar.

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    #5

    Re: nor

    TheParser, thank you for a very helpful reply.
    You explained it very well.

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    #6

    Re: nor

    Here is another example:

    "I have never seen such a beautiful girl."
    "Never have I seen such a beautiful girl."


    Both are correct, but the second one is stronger.

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    #7

    Re: nor

    Quote Originally Posted by joeoct View Post
    Here is another example:

    "I have never seen such a beautiful girl."
    "Never have I seen such a beautiful girl."

    Both are correct, but the second one is stronger.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #8

    Re: nor

    joeoct wrote:

    "As much as I can remember, that's Tolstoy. I will call him tomorrow for a help. "

    A mini grammar lesson for you to consider joeoct

    My response in part to your original question was

    You would have to ask the writer why he or she composed a sentence in this way.

    the use of "would" rather than "will" makes the sentence theoretical and should have made it quite clear to you that I was not suggesting you could or should contact the original writer.

    May I suggest that before you resort to sarcasm you make sure you really
    understand what you are reading.

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    #9

    Re: nor

    Quote Originally Posted by bwkcaj_ca View Post
    joeoct wrote:

    "As much as I can remember, that's Tolstoy. I will call him tomorrow for a help. "

    A mini grammar lesson for you to consider joeoct

    My response in part to your original question was

    You would have to ask the writer why he or she composed a sentence in this way.

    the use of "would" rather than "will" makes the sentence theoretical and should have made it quite clear to you that I was not suggesting you could or should contact the original writer.

    May I suggest that before you resort to sarcasm you make sure you really
    understand what you are reading.
    bwkcaj_ca, that was quite incautious, but please consider that it was only a joke (maybe it could be understood in other way, as you did).

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    #10

    Re: nor

    There is no such word in the English language as 'incautious'. Perhaps you mean rude, impolite or disrespectful.

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