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  1. Member
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    #1

    browbeat someone into doing something

    Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary
    browbeat
    [+ obj] : to use threats or angry speech to make (someone) do or accept something
    ▪ His father likes to browbeat waiters and waitresses. often + into ▪ He refuses to be browbeaten into making changes he thinks are not necessary.
    Is it wrong to say "browbeat someone to do something" to mean "browbeat someone into doing something"?

  2. Moderator
    Retired English Teacher
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    #2

    Re: browbeat someone into doing something

    No, it's not wrong.

    After the stock-market crash of 1929, Hoover browbeat business leaders to keep wages and prices high.

    dispatchpolitics.com
    (FrazeIt.com)

    Rover

  3. Member
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    #3

    Re: browbeat someone into doing something

    1. browbeat someone into doing something
    2. browbeat someone to do something

    Is #1 more commonly used than #2?

  4. Moderator
    Retired English Teacher
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    #4

    Re: browbeat someone into doing something

    Yes

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