Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. Junior Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Tagalog
      • Home Country:
      • Philippines
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines

    • Join Date: May 2011
    • Posts: 73
    #1

    content vs. contented

    What's the difference between I felt content and I felt contented? Or between I was content and I was contented.

    Thank you!

  2. Moderator
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 29,192
    #2

    Re: content vs. contented

    I found this:

    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/a...s-comfort.html

    by looking at the Similar Threads at the bottom of the page.

    Rover

  3. VIP Member
    Other
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,470
    #3

    Re: content vs. contented

    Quote Originally Posted by Yura Reiri View Post
    What's the difference between I felt content and I felt contented? Or between I was content and I was contented.

    Thank you!

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Yura Reiri:


    (1) I have been trying for years to find a good explanation, and I have

    never found one.

    (2) I shall be happy to share the little (very little) that I have

    learned.

    (a) Most books and teachers say the two words are interchangeable.

    (b) So it doesn't matter which one you use -- you are as correct

    as anyone else!!! Even native speakers do not agree!!!

    (c) There is only one time when you MUST use "contented": when it

    comes before a noun:

    "Mona is a very contented person."

    "The milk from our farm comes from contented cows."

    (d) Some (repeat: some) people feel that "content" is better for

    a permanent state/condition:

    A big newspaper has offered a good job to Tom, but he doesn't want it.

    He says, "I don't want to move to the big city. I feel/am perfectly

    content to stay in this small town until the day I die."

    (e) Some (repeat: some) people feel that "contented" involves

    some kind of action/doing:

    I want our daughter to go to college. She doesn't want to. My wife

    and I are very unhappy. But yesterday she came to us and said, "I know

    how you feel, and you know how I feel. So I am going to do this: I am

    going to attend college for one year. If I like it, I'll continue; if I don't,

    I'll leave." I felt/was very contented with her decision.

    (3) Maybe (a big "maybe") the best thing for a learner (and even a

    native speaker) to do is this:

    (a) Of course, ALWAYS use "contented" in front of a noun.

    (b) For ALL other sentences, use "content." You will always be

    "right" (since most native speakers say they are interchangeable).

    Sincerely,


    James


    P.S. You have probably heard of the famous radio/TV/Internet

    company in the United Kingdom called the British Broadcasting

    Corporation. One person checked bbc.co.uk, and he found 1,910

    examples of "not content" and 6 (!!!) examples of "not contented."

  4. nyota's Avatar
    Senior Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 623
    #4

    Re: content vs. contented

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post

    (c) There is only one time when you MUST use "contented": when it

    comes before a noun
    :

    "Mona is a very contented person."

    "The milk from our farm comes from contented cows."
    What about the following example though? It seems correct.

    Sitting back down with a happy and content smile, I was surprised when a small lady in the audience stood up and walked over to the orange filled stage.
    Source: BBC - Mid Wales Arts - Rachel's Review - Aber Acoustic Platform

  5. VIP Member
    Other
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,470
    #5

    Re: content vs. contented

    Quote Originally Posted by nyota View Post
    What about the following example though? It seems correct.

    Source: BBC - Mid Wales Arts - Rachel's Review - Aber Acoustic Platform

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Nyota:


    (1) Thank you for your interesting example.

    (2) Surely no one can ever say that the wonderful BBC is ever

    "wrong" !!!

    (3) But I believe that the general "rule" in the United States is to

    use "contented" in front of a noun. I thnk (of course, I do not

    know) that most Americans' ears would prefer the sound of

    "contented" in that sentence.

    (4) And, of course, it is a "good" rule because it makes life so much

    easier. That is, if you want to modify a noun and just use "contented"

    each time, you do not have to go crazy trying to decide whether you

    should use "content" or "contented."

    Sincerely,


    James

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •