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    #1

    buckle down

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enoughto give me your considered opinion concerning my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    If it’s something I’m excited to do, or that interests me, I will get it done, but if it’s something I don’t really want to do, I really need to buckle down and concentrate.

    buckle down = apply oneself with determination

    I know that buckle down = concentrate on also that suggest on me there is some redundancy in the sentence above.

    Would you tell me whether exited is used properly in the sentence in question?

    V.

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    #2

    Re: buckle down

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enoughto give me your considered opinion concerning my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    If itís something Iím excited to do, or that interests me, I will get it done, but if itís something I donít really want to do, I really need to buckle down and concentrate.

    buckle down = apply oneself with determination

    I know that buckle down = concentrate on also that suggest on me there is some redundancy in the sentence above.

    Would you tell me whether exited is used properly in the sentence in question?

    V.
    Not a teacher only a native.

    I think the sentence is fine, and you have interpreted 'bucke down' rightly, though I would add there might be a sense of resentment also. For example, you would 'buckle down' to a job that you may not enjoy but you know it has to be done.

    'Buckle down' doesn't exactly translate as 'concentrate on', though it could mean that. So it would be possible to 'buckle down' and concentrate, they sometimes occur together, like in your example.

    The phrase was commonly used when revising for my exams .

    Lastly, I think the use of 'excited' is also fine. The speaker/write is saying that if the job is something they are looking forward to, then they don't mind doing it. You can be 'excited' to do something, for example many people like repairing classic cars.

    • Member Info
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    #3

    Re: buckle down

    Hi shroob,

    Thank you for your helpful explanations.

    Now I see what you mean concerning the usage of the excited namely at the present case excited = agitated, astir and not uneasy, strung, nervy as I figured wrongly in my mind.

    V.

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