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    #1

    2 Questions for you.

    In the US war movies we often hear the soldiers using a phrase called "ROGER THAT". Its like when they are instructed to do something in reply they use the term "ROGER THAT". What does it mean actually?

    My second question is: should we say get-off me or get-off of me. What is the difference? and also is it I beg you or I beg of you? which one is correct?

    Yours Faithfully,

    Abhsihek Ghosh

  1. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: 2 Questions for you.

    "Roger" and "Roger that" is an acknowledgement - it means the listener has received and understood the transmission. The use of "Roger" began in World War II - it was part of the phonetic alphabet (Alpha, Bravo, Charlie, Delta, etc). The word "received" begins with an "R", so instead of just replying with the letter "R" the traditional response became the phonetic alphabet equivalent of "Roger."

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: 2 Questions for you.

    Quote Originally Posted by britdam007 View Post
    In the US war movies we often hear the soldiers using a phrase called "ROGER THAT". Its like when they are instructed to do something in reply they use the term "ROGER THAT". What does it mean actually?

    My second question is: should we say get-off me or get-off of me. What is the difference? and also is it I beg you or I beg of you? which one is correct?

    Yours Faithfully,

    Abhsihek Ghosh
    That's actually 3 questions. In future, it will be a good idea to post each question in a separate thread to avoid confusion in the answers.

    1) ROGER THAT - In a radio conversation, they use the word "Roger" to mean "I understand", to confirm receipt of a message and that the instructions or orders have been understood.

    2) There is no such phrase as "get-off". If you are telling someone to stop touching you physically, then you would say "Get off me" or "Get away from me".

    3) We need some context for "I beg you" versus "I beg of you". Please post an example sentence for each.

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