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    #1

    Hello there!

    Which is more appropriate
    1."You may not agree with what I am saying" or "You might not agree with what I am saying"
    Also, could you please tell me the diferemce between may and might. Thanks you!

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    #2

    Re: Hello there!

    Quote Originally Posted by oxford2011 View Post
    Which is more appropriate
    1."You may not agree with what I am saying" or "You might not agree with what I am saying"
    Also, could you please tell me the diferemce between may and might. Thanks you!
    Not a teacher only a native.

    Not a lot is different between may and might, they are often used interchangeably.

    In general however, may is used to express or ask permission. For example, 'May I go to the toilet?'
    'Yes, you may.'
    Also to show a small possibility of something.
    'I may go to the cinema later.'

    Might is used to show there is a small probability of something.
    I 'might go to the cinema later'.

    I would say 'might' suggests a smaller possibility than 'may'.

    Hope this helps.

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    #3

    Re: Hello there!

    Not a teacher neither a native speaker

    I think there is slight difference between the two sentences, in genera,l may is a little bit more sure whereas might expresses more doubt.

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    #4

    Re: Hello there!

    Oxford, you have been asked before to give your threads more meaningful titles - such as May or might.

    Hello there! has nothing to do with your question.

    You also need to make use of our Search box at the top of the page.

    Enter May or might into the box and you will find links to many discussions on this topic.

    Rover

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Hello there!

    Quote Originally Posted by shroob View Post
    I would say 'might' suggests a smaller possibility than 'may'.
    I'd suggest that this is wrong.
    "He may go to the cinema tonight" and "He might go to the cinema tonight" suggest the same probability.

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    #6

    Re: Hello there!

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I'd suggest that this is wrong.
    "He may go to the cinema tonight" and "He might go to the cinema tonight" suggest the same probability.

    I thought that they were the same at first, however I found a number of sites on the internet suggesting that 'might' suggets a smaller probablility than 'may'.

    http://www.miguelmllop.com/grammars/mygrammar/may.pdf - Page 3

    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/a.../27115-ms.html - 'Riverkid' suggests this as well.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Hello there!

    Quote Originally Posted by shroob View Post
    I thought that they were the same at first, however I found a number of sites on the internet suggesting that 'might' suggets a smaller probablility than 'may'.

    http://www.miguelmllop.com/grammars/mygrammar/may.pdf - Page 3

    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/a.../27115-ms.html - 'Riverkid' suggests this as well.
    It's a common misconception, perhaps based on ancient use. The fact is (I know somebody is going to dispute this) that there is no difference in probability in modern English.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Hello there!

    I would discern no difference in probability between "I might ..." and "I may ..."

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    #9

    Re: Hello there!

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    It's a common misconception, perhaps based on ancient use. The fact is (I know somebody is going to dispute this) that there is no difference in probability in modern English.
    Ok, I stand corrected.

    Thanks for clearing that up.

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Hello there!

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    The fact is (I know somebody is going to dispute this) that there is no difference in probability in modern English.
    OK - I'll dispute it, just to keep you happy. I still feel a difference.

    However, I have to admit that I am in such a tiny minority that I accept that I am past my sell-by date.

    So, for practical purposes, I agree with bhai.

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