Results 1 to 3 of 3
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #1

    cry craven

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    I will make that slanderous wretch cry craven in the dust. (R. Southey, “Madoc”)

    cry craven = show the white feather, turn tail, lick someone’s boots for forgiveness
    V.

  1. riquecohen's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Aug 2010
    • Posts: 6,002
    #2

    Re: cry craven

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    I will make that slanderous wretch cry craven in the dust. (R. Southey, “Madoc”)

    cry craven = show the white feather, turn tail, lick someone’s boots for forgiveness
    V.
    I suppose that some of your suggestions are correct, though nobody I know uses those expressions. More simply put, it just means "to give up." Look here.Craven | Define Craven at Dictionary.com

  2. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #3

    Re: cry craven

    Quote Originally Posted by riquecohen View Post
    I suppose that some of your suggestions are correct, though nobody I know uses those expressions.
    I suppose you don't know anybody who uses 'quoth', or 'philter' or 'joyance', either. What a sheltered life you lead, riquecohen.

    Quoth Urien, He so dotes, as she had dropt
    Some philter in his cup, to lethargize
    The British blood that came from Owen's veins.
    Three days his halls have echoed to the song
    Of joyance
    .


    from Madoc (1805), by Robet Southey.

Similar Threads

  1. CRY!
    By sabz in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 30-May-2011, 08:08
  2. [General] Cry
    By farzadjalali in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-Dec-2010, 07:42
  3. cry no more
    By joham in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-Sep-2008, 06:57
  4. cry of or cry for
    By kiranlegend in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 14-Aug-2008, 13:21
  5. cry over/for a novel
    By angliholic in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 26-Nov-2007, 15:43

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •