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    #1

    take the rap

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    Over there is Rubi Riskin – he’s a good fellow. He visits his old dad down in Joliet Penitentiary at least once a month. The old man took the rap for them both in an arson case. (S. Bellow, “The Adventure of Augie March”)

    take the rap = bear the brunt, get in the neck, get a good ticking off

    V.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: take the rap

    Took the blame, accepted the responsibility (and punishment) for something, with the understanding that it was someone else who was responsible.

    (In this case, they were both responsible, but he accepted sole responsibility.)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: take the rap

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    Over there is Rubi Riskin – he’s a good fellow. He visits his old dad down in Joliet Penitentiary at least once a month. The old man took the rap for them both in an arson case. (S. Bellow, “The Adventure of Augie March”)

    take the rap = bear the brunt, get in the neck, get a good ticking off

    V.
    I agree with Barb's response.While bear the brunt almost fits, I wonder where your other phrases came from.

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    #4

    Re: take the rap

    It stands to reason that the inadequate for the present case phrases are from my emergency stock I use so frivolous talking in large.



    V.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: take the rap

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    It stands to reason that the inadequate for the present case phrases are from my emergency stock I use so frivolous talking in large.



    V.
    I'm sorry, I couldn't follow that. Could you say it another way?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

    Re: take the rap

    It stands to reason that the inadequate for the present case phrases are from my emergency stock I use so frivolous talking in large.

    it stands to reason that = if it stands to reason that something happens or is true or it is crystal clear

    emergency stock = emergency rations

    stock = fund as in: stock of knowledge or fund of knowledge

    talking in large =

    When scientists are talking in large numbers like light years and the vast distances in between the galaxies they need a shorter way to write it. ..

    Read more: http://www.answers.com/talking+in+large?ws_only=true&start=10#ixzz1R9Pvq2 KY



    It is crystal clear that my interpretations of the expression in question are unsuitable and ineligible for you likewise hundreds other which you wrote off as beneath your attention and classified as old and not up-to-date ones. I don’t know how to put into words the account of the real state of affairs. Come to that, I make a public avowal that the unsuccessful interpretations in question are from my scanty emergency stock of knowledge which I use in my posts so frivolous for your great dissatisfaction.

    V.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: take the rap

    Vil, I am mystified by your response.

    I made an honest attempt to help you understand the expression. It was clearly NOT "beneath my attention." Your misunderstanding was neither satisfying nor dissatisfying to me. I simply wanted to help you get the right meaning.

    What is the correct way to explain something, if our attempts are so off-putting to you?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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