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  1. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #1

    You're yanking me, right?

    A: We don't keep score. We think
    it's healthier if the kids just play for fun.

    B: You're yanking me, right?
    Yanks means, according the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English:

    yank / jæŋk / verb [ intransitive and transitive ]

    informal to suddenly pull something quickly and with force yank something out/back/open etc One of the men grabbed Tom’s hair and yanked his head back.
    Nick yanked the door open.

    yank on/at With both hands she yanked at the necklace.


    yank noun [ countable ] : He gave the rope a yank .

    This definition however doesn't apply to the sentence I quoted above. "Yank" seems to mean here "to kid".





    You're yanking (kidding) me, right?

    Am I correct? Is this American slang?

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: You're yanking me, right?

    Quote Originally Posted by Chicken Sandwich View Post
    Yanks means, according the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English:



    This definition however doesn't apply to the sentence I quoted above. "Yank" seems to mean here "to kid".





    You're yanking (kidding) me, right?

    Am I correct? Is this American slang?
    It does mean "joking with me", "kidding me". I think (but happy to corrected by an AmE speaker) that it comes from "You're yanking my chain" meaning the same thing.

    Side note : I assume the spam message above mine will be deleted quite soon.

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    #3

    Re: You're yanking me, right?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post

    Side note : I assume the spam message above mine will be deleted quite soon.
    Yup

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: You're yanking me, right?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    It does mean "joking with me", "kidding me". I think (but happy to corrected by an AmE speaker) that it comes from "You're yanking my chain" meaning the same thing.

    ....
    Or 'pulling my chain'. Presumably, the idiom refers to a sort of lavatory cistern - although the relevance of lavatories to kidding isn't obvious to me (except maybe by way of the possibly related 'pi$$ing me about'): http://www.salvoweb.com/images/useri...19/44071_1.jpg. Or maybe it's the sort of chain tethering a slave or a performing animal - making it do things it doesn't want to.

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 05-Jul-2011 at 14:43. Reason: Add further speculation

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: You're yanking me, right?

    In the US, we'd say "you're yanking my chain" or "you're pulling my leg."

    To just say "you're yanking me" would sound odd to me.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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