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    #1

    How does this sentence work?

    The Supreme Court decision “strikes a blow to those who face discrimination in the workplace to be able to join together and hold companies, especially large companies, accountable for the full range of discrimination they may be responsible for,” said Marcia D. Greenberger, co-president of the National Women’s Law Centre.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/21/business/21class.html
    Hello, one.

    I've read this sentence over and over and still can't work how this "to be able to join together" bit fits into the whole sentence.

    I'd be so glad to hear your takes on it.

    Many thanks

    Richard

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    #2

    Re: How does this sentence work?

    If 500 workers in different branches are treated badly by a company, they can sue individually- 500 separate cases, which is difficult. If they come together as a class action, then there is one case, which makes things more manageable. However, this case has changed things- now they will have to show that their poor treatment came from a central policy and not simply show that it was happening in many branches.

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    #3

    Re: How does this sentence work?

    Quote Originally Posted by cubezero3 View Post
    Hello, one.

    I've read this sentence over and over and still can't work how this "to be able to join together" bit fits into the whole sentence.

    I'd be so glad to hear your takes on it.

    Many thanks

    Richard
    See Tdol's response, and the sentence could be restated as:

    The Supreme Court decision might make it difficult for anyone who faces discrimination to join with others to hold companies accountable for that action.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: How does this sentence work?

    Quote Originally Posted by cubezero3 View Post
    Hello, one.

    I've read this sentence over and over and still can't work how this "to be able to join together" bit fits into the whole sentence.

    I'd be so glad to hear your takes on it.

    Many thanks

    Richard
    "Striking a blow for workers to be able to join together" sounds like a mixed metaphor, or at least a non sequitur. It's not surprising that you had trouble with it.

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    #5

    Re: How does this sentence work?

    Thanks for you replies, Tdol, billmcd and Raymott.

    I didn't express my question clearly a few days ago. I guess it's because I didn't really know where to start. It seems I have a clearer idea now.

    What struck me first was that this sentence is not grammartical. There is a lack of something in this sentence, it seems to me. I am still at a loss as to how I should put it, so I will add the bit which I think is missing.

    The Supreme Court decision “strikes a blow to those who face discrimination in the workplace (and are) to be able to join together

    Richard

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: How does this sentence work?

    Quote Originally Posted by cubezero3 View Post

    The Supreme Court decision “strikes a blow to those who face discrimination in the workplace (and are) to be able to join together

    Richard
    That doesn't make it grammatical, I"m afraid. One way to rephrase this is to say "strikes a blow against those who face discrimination in the workplace and their ability to join together "
    or
    "strikes a blow against those who face discrimination in the workplace and who are seeking to join together "
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: How does this sentence work?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    "Striking a blow for workers to be able to join together" sounds like a mixed metaphor, or at least a non sequitur. It's not surprising that you had trouble with it.
    Oops, I misread this as "strikes a blow for", ie. the court decision was actually in favour of the discriminated, allowing them to join together.
    The original sentence doesn't make sense.

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