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  1. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #1

    Question "to regulate somebody"?

    Hi all,
    Can the verb 'regulate' be used for humans? The example once I heard must be something like, 'our boss has regulated us not to wear informal dress'. What does it exactly mean in this context? (to establish discipline by force?!)



    Thanks!

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "to regulate somebody"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Hi all,
    Can the verb 'regulate' be used for humans? The example once I heard must be something like, 'our boss has regulated us not to wear informal dress'. What does it exactly mean in this context? (to establish discipline by force?!)



    Thanks!
    Was that written by a native speaker? I've never heard it.

    There is one situation I know about where it's possible. A mentally ill person can be "regulated". This means "certified", or placed under a regulation of the Mental Health Act - for most purposes, it means they are able to be detained without permission, locked up for treatment.

  3. Mehrgan's Avatar
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      • Persian
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    #3

    Re: "to regulate somebody"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Was that written by a native speaker? I've never heard it.

    There is one situation I know about where it's possible. A mentally ill person can be "regulated". This means "certified", or placed under a regulation of the Mental Health Act - for most purposes, it means they are able to be detained without permission, locked up for treatment.

    Thank you so much! No, not indeed. A friend insisted that he had heard it used that way.


    Thank you for the information! Cheers!

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