Results 1 to 4 of 4
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Spain
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Feb 2011
    • Posts: 99
    #1

    To exert

    Hi,

    Can anyone tell me if the following sentence is very formal or incorrect? The meaning is that the person is a lawyer but doesn't work as a lawyer.

    "He does not exert as a lawyer."

    Thank you

  1. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #2

    Re: To exert

    It's incorrect.

    He doesn't practise as a lawyer.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #3

    Re: To exert

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    It's incorrect.

    He doesn't practise as a lawyer.
    Yes, or perhaps better, "He's a non-practicing lawyer".
    I also don't practice as a lawyer, but I'm not a non-practicing lawyer.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #4

    Re: To exert

    Note: Practice - noun
    Practise - verb, BrE
    Practice - verb, AmE and, presumably, AusE.

Similar Threads

  1. exert
    By XINLAI-UE in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-Sep-2008, 10:53

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •