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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Question Confused with noun cases

    Hi,
    i have few questions on noun cases. kindly help me for the same.
    How can i identify noun cases for a given sentence, do we have a formula or syntax for each noun cases.
    what is a difference between nominative and objective noun case
    for example "Patsy reads newspaper" why its a nominative case why cant it be an objecttive case.

    i would really appreciate if some one could actually help me in sorting this out.

    Thanks for your time and consideration.

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    #2

    Re: Confused with noun cases

    Quote Originally Posted by nsj85 View Post
    i I have few questions on noun cases. kKindly help me for the same with them..
    How can i I identify noun cases for a given sentence d ? Do we have a formula or syntax for each noun cases.?
    w What is a the difference between nominative and objective noun cases?
    f For example, "Patsy reads a newspaper"; why its is it a nominative case; why can't it be an objecttive case.?
    Please try to pay some attention to the basic rules of punctuation and capitalisation.

    Grammarians generally do not consider that nouns in English have cases.

    Patsy reads a newspaper.

    Patsy is the subject of the verb reads; newspaper is the direct object.

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    #3

    Re: Confused with noun cases

    Hey Thanks for replying.
    Actually, I was in a little hurry while posting my question. Apologies for the same
    Well, I am still not clear why that example will be a nominative case and not objective as the definition for objective case says:The objective case is that form or state of a noun or pronoun which usually tells the object of a verb, participle, or preposition. The object of a verb, participle, or preposition, is that which answers to whom or what after it
    For example: Patsy reads a newspaper
    Patsy reads what? Newspaper which is a noun
    Is this wrong?
    Please advise.
    Do we have syntax for noun cases?

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    #4

    Re: Confused with noun cases

    Quote Originally Posted by nsj85 View Post
    Hi,
    i have few questions on noun cases. kindly help me for the same.
    How can i identify noun cases for a given sentence, do we have a formula or syntax for each noun cases.
    what is a difference between nominative and objective noun case
    for example "Patsy reads newspaper" why its a nominative case why cant it be an objecttive case.

    i would really appreciate if some one could actually help me in sorting this out.

    Thanks for your time and consideration.

    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) Unlike some languages, the most important thing in English is position.

    (2) The nominative case refers to the subject; the objective case refers to the object.

    (3) He loves her.

    (a) "He" is the subject, so it's in the nominative case.

    (b) "Her" is the object, so ....

    Now look at what happens if you change it to the passive:

    She is loved by him.

    (a) "She" is in the nominative case now (it's the subject now).

    (b) "him" is in the objective case (object of the preposition "by").

    (4) For "perfect" English, some people still say "It is I."

    (a) "It" is the subject (nominative case).
    (b) "is" is a linking verb. In other words, the same as an = mark.
    (c) Therefore, "I." (We use the nominative case because the = mark connects two nominative forms.)
    (i) In actual English, most speakers say "It is me." But "me" is the objective case.
    Nevertheless, most English speakers prefer this "incorrect" use of "me."

    ***

    "Patsy reads a newspaper."

    (a) "Patsy" is the subject, so the nominative case.
    (b) "newspaper" is the object, so the objective case.

    "A newspaper is read by Patsy."

    (a) "Newspaper" is now in the nominative case.
    (b) "Patsy" is now in the objective case.

    "Look!!! That girl over there is Patsy!!!"

    (a) What case is "Patsy"? You are correct! "Patsy" is in the nominative case.

    (b) Why? Correct again. Because "Patsy" follows a linking verb and refers to the

    subject (which, of course, is in the nominative case).

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    #5

    Re: Confused with noun cases

    Quote Originally Posted by nsj85 View Post
    For example: Patsy reads a newspaper
    Patsy reads what? Newspaper which is a noun
    Is this wrong?
    Who says that newspaper is subject (nominative) here? Where did this come from? It's wrong.

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    #6

    Re: Confused with noun cases

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) Unlike some languages, the most important thing in English is position.

    (2) The nominative case refers to the subject; the objective case refers to the object.

    (3) He loves her.

    (a) "He" is the subject, so it's in the nominative case.

    (b) "Her" is the object, so ....

    Now look at what happens if you change it to the passive:

    She is loved by him.

    (a) "She" is in the nominative case now (it's the subject now).

    (b) "him" is in the objective case (object of the preposition "by").

    (4) For "perfect" English, some people still say "It is I."

    (a) "It" is the subject (nominative case).
    (b) "is" is a linking verb. In other words, the same as an = mark.
    (c) Therefore, "I." (We use the nominative case because the = mark connects two nominative forms.)
    (i) In actual English, most speakers say "It is me." But "me" is the objective case.
    Nevertheless, most English speakers prefer this "incorrect" use of "me."

    ***

    "Patsy reads a newspaper."

    (a) "Patsy" is the subject, so the nominative case.
    (b) "newspaper" is the object, so the objective case.

    "A newspaper is read by Patsy."

    (a) "Newspaper" is now in the nominative case.
    (b) "Patsy" is now in the objective case.

    "Look!!! That girl over there is Patsy!!!"

    (a) What case is "Patsy"? You are correct! "Patsy" is in the nominative case.

    (b) Why? Correct again. Because "Patsy" follows a linking verb and refers to the

    subject (which, of course, is in the nominative case).
    Hey, thanks a lot. Infact, it was really helpful.
    Can you also suggest any good books about noun cases and modifiers.
    Thanks a lot for your time and consideration.
    Cheers!!!!!!

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    #7

    Re: Confused with noun cases

    Quote Originally Posted by nsj85 View Post
    Hey, thanks a lot. Infact, it was really helpful.
    Can you also suggest any good books about noun cases and modifiers.
    Thanks a lot for your time and consideration.
    Cheers!!!!!!

    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) Thank you for your kind note.

    (2) I do not know any books that I can recommend that discuss noun cases.

    (3) I suggest that you start a new thread and ask for book recommendations.

    Be specific as to what you are seeking.

    (4) Hopefully, some teachers and non-teachers are acquainted with the

    newest grammar books.

    (5) And, of course, you can find a lot of material on the Web.

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