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    #1

    Red face problems in english film

    When I watched a film, I saw a question "What did your last slave die of? " and a phrasal verb " for goodness' sake". I was confused of course.
    So can you help me explain them?
    Thanks a lot.

  1. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: problems in english film

    Quote Originally Posted by trangwin25 View Post
    When I watched a film, I saw a question "What did your last slave die of? " and a phrasal verb " for goodness' sake". I was confused of course.
    So can you help me explain them?
    Thanks a lot.
    "What was the cause of death of your last slave?"
    For "for goodness' sake," look here. for goodness' sake - Idioms - by the Free Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: problems in english film

    "What did your last slave die of?" is a sarcastic comment usually made when someone asks you to do something for them, especially something that they could have done easily themselves.

    For example:

    Two people are sitting on a sofa (couch) near a table with a bottle of wine and two glasses. One person says "Can you pour another glass of wine for me?" It would have been very easy for that person to pour the wine themselves so the second person says "What did your last slave die of?" (ie "You are treating me like a slave so I assume that your last slave is dead and I am the replacement.")

  3. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: problems in english film

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    "What did your last slave die of?" is a sarcastic comment usually made when someone asks you to do something for them, especially something that they could have done easily themselves.

    For example:

    Two people are sitting on a sofa (couch) near a table with a bottle of wine and two glasses. One person says "Can you pour another glass of wine for me?" It would have been very easy for that person to pour the wine themselves so the second person says "What did your last slave die of?" (ie "You are treating me like a slave so I assume that your last slave is dead and I am the replacement.")
    Incredible! I had never before heard this expression. Is it frequently heard in BrE?

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: problems in english film

    I was equally lost!
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. SanMar's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: problems in english film

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I was equally lost!
    Same here.
    The closest thing I can think of is "Who died and made you King?" more for bossy people rather than lazy ones though.



    Not a teacher.

  6. 5jj's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: problems in english film

    Quote Originally Posted by riquecohen View Post
    Incredible! I had never before heard this expression. Is it frequently heard in BrE?
    Reasonably frequently, yes.

  7. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: problems in english film

    Maybe because the idea of slavery, still embarrassingly recent in our history, is so sensitive is why we don't know this one here. I'd suggest not using it in the US. An acceptable and sarcastic replacement could be "oh are the bones in both legs broken?" or something along those lines.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: problems in english film

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Maybe because the idea of slavery, still embarrassingly recent in our history, is so sensitive is why we don't know this one here. I'd suggest not using it in the US. An acceptable and sarcastic replacement could be "oh are the bones in both legs broken?" or something along those lines.
    That may well be the case. Having said that, Britain wasn't exactly a hotbed of slavery so I've always wondered why it's not just "What did your last servant die of?"

  9. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: problems in english film

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    That may well be the case. Having said that, Britain wasn't exactly a hotbed of slavery so I've always wondered why it's not just "What did your last servant die of?"
    I've heard it with "servant" very often.

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