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    #1

    tutor

    If you call a female private teacher as a governess, then how do you call a male private teacher? Please. Thank you!

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    #2

    Re: tutor

    Quote Originally Posted by notletrest View Post
    If you call a female private teacher as a governess, then how do you call a male private teacher? Please. Thank you!
    Not a teacher only a native.

    A tutor is the word I would use. Though 'tutor' could refer to men or women. In this context, I don't think governess has a male equivalent.

    In other uses (such as in government), the masculine version of governess is governor.

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    #3

    Re: tutor

    Quote Originally Posted by shroob View Post
    Not a teacher only a native.

    A tutor is the word I would use. Though 'tutor' could refer to men or women. In this context, I don't think governess has a male equivalent.

    In other uses (such as in government), the masculine version of governess is governor.
    Thank you for your ideal. BUt I wonder why there is not its male equivalent. Maybe in the United Kindom there is not such a grown-up,er?

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    #4

    Re: tutor

    Quote Originally Posted by notletrest View Post
    Thank you for your ideal. BUt I wonder why there is not its male equivalent. Maybe in the United Kindom there is not such a grown-up,er?
    Not a teacher only a native.

    I'm not sure why there isn't an equivalent, I only knew the term after googling it, reading the wikipedia entry and a yahoo answer page.

    From my understanding the word is Victorian, there were definitely 'governess' in the UK, but in Victorian times. In the UK today I don't think the term is used, I could be wrong, but I've never heard of one recently though I am quite young. I can only comment from the 1990s onwards .

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: tutor

    Do people still have governesses these day?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

    Re: tutor

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Do people still have governesses these day?
    I came across it in the <<Chambers 20th Century Dictionary>> by E M Kirkpatrick in 1983. It means " a lady who has charge of the insruction of the young at home or in school."
    Thanks a lot!

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    #7

    Re: tutor

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Do people still have governesses these day?
    I wonder as English study why Englishmen so stress " today ". thinking "a pair of shoes" has gone out, and "governess " has gone out, too. We are studying English. We ,Chinese, treat both " before " and " now " equally for study. I see.
    Thanks a lot!

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    #8

    Re: tutor

    Quote Originally Posted by shroob View Post
    Not a teacher only a native.

    I'm not sure why there isn't an equivalent, I only knew the term after googling it, reading the wikipedia entry and a yahoo answer page.

    From my understanding the word is Victorian, there were definitely 'governess' in the UK, but in Victorian times. In the UK today I don't think the term is used, I could be wrong, but I've never heard of one recently though I am quite young. I can only comment from the 1990s onwards .
    Thanks for your further expplanation.

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    #9

    Re: tutor

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Do people still have governesses these day?
    Very few- even the royal family go to schools.

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    #10

    Re: tutor

    I believe in this context tutor can be considered the masculine equivalent of governess.

    In Victorian times -and well into the XXth century, actually- private instructors employed by wealthy families were called governesses (for their daughters) and tutors (for their sons).

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