Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. Key Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 2,352
    #1

    We have fifteen minutes (in which) to eat.

    If we are given fifteen minutes to finish our meal, which sentence should I use? If neither, how should it be worded with 'eat' as the verb?

    1. We have fifteen minutes to eat.

    2. We have fifteen minutes in which to eat.

    Thanks.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #2

    Re: We have fifteen minutes (in which) to eat.

    1. We have fifteen minutes to eat. You will hear this, but I prefer, "We have fifteen minutes to eat in".

    2. We have fifteen minutes in which to eat. Fine. It's a little more formal than #1.
    Last edited by 5jj; 21-Jul-2011 at 21:26. Reason: typos

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
    Moderator
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 44,294
    #3

    Re: We have fifteen minutes (in which) to eat.

    Number 2 is fine.

    I hate to disagree with 5jj but I would not use "in" at the end of sentence 1. I think "We've got 15 minutes to eat" is natural and often used.

    You've got 10 minutes to play and then it's time for dinner.
    He's got a week to have fun.
    You've got 2 minutes to get dressed (or to dress).

  4. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 60,232
    #4

    Re: We have fifteen minutes (in which) to eat.

    I wouldn't use in at the end either, but it sounds natural to me- many would.

Similar Threads

  1. [General] eat one's dinner, eat for the bar
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-Sep-2010, 13:24
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 25-Nov-2008, 13:22
  3. 'eat a humble pie' & ' eat crow' ---Wats d difference?
    By hemantg in forum English Idioms and Sayings
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 14-Feb-2007, 18:29
  4. 'eat a humble pie' & ' eat crow' ---Wats d difference?
    By hemantg in forum English Idioms and Sayings
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 22-Jan-2007, 14:22
  5. 1500 in fifteen hundred?
    By ripley in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-Mar-2005, 05:00

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •