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  1. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #1

    Question Any British name for 'baloney', please?

    Hi there,
    Is there any British equivalent for 'baloney' or 'bologna'?





    Thanks!

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Any British name for 'baloney', please?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Hi there,
    Is there any British equivalent for 'baloney' or 'bologna'?


    Thanks!
    In which meaning? Where a New Yorker would say 'That's baloney' a stereotypical Englishman might say 'I could be wrong, old chap, but I think you may have got the wrong end of the bally old proverbial, doncherknow?'.

    But when it comes to the naming of spiced sausages, the English as a whole have fairly limited vocabulary - salami, chorizo, and Bratwurst are about it. If the context makes it clear that you are talking about charcuterie, 'balony' can be used sometimes. (I've only met bologna in a very (self-consciously) 'precious' context - a book about fashionablle delicatessen food).

    b

  3. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Any British name for 'baloney', please?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    In which meaning? Where a New Yorker would say 'That's baloney' a stereotypical Englishman might say 'I could be wrong, old chap, but I think you may have got the wrong end of the bally old proverbial, doncherknow?'.

    But when it comes to the naming of spiced sausages, the English as a whole have fairly limited vocabulary - salami, chorizo, and Bratwurst are about it. If the context makes it clear that you are talking about charcuterie, 'balony' can be used sometimes. (I've only met bologna in a very (self-consciously) 'precious' context - a book about fashionablle delicatessen food).

    b
    Thanks. Indeed I wondered if there was a specific noun used by the British speakers refering to this food.


    Cheers!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Baloney.bmp  

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    #4

    Re: Any British name for 'baloney', please?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Thanks. Indeed I wondered if there was a specific noun used by the British speakers refering to this food.
    Polony.

    polony [pəˈləʊnɪ]

    (Cookery) Brit. another name for bologna sausage
    (The Free Dictionary)

    Rover

  4. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Any British name for 'baloney', please?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    In which meaning? Where a New Yorker would say 'That's baloney' a stereotypical Englishman might say 'I could be wrong, old chap, but I think you may have got the wrong end of the bally old proverbial, doncherknow?'.

    But when it comes to the naming of spiced sausages, the English as a whole have fairly limited vocabulary - salami, chorizo, and Bratwurst are about it. If the context makes it clear that you are talking about charcuterie, 'balony' can be used sometimes. (I've only met bologna in a very (self-consciously) 'precious' context - a book about fashionablle delicatessen food).

    b
    Blech. Bologna is in no way fashionable, in my humble opinion. Maybe I'm prejudiced because the mere thought of bologna triggers my gag reflex, but to my mind high-end delicatessen food means prosciutto, corned beef, pastrami, etc. Bologna is in the same el disgusto category with olive loaf and Spam. (Mr. Ouisch loves both bologna and Spam and dares to call me "pretentious." Pish-tosh, I say!)
    Last edited by Ouisch; 26-Jul-2011 at 09:54.

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    #6

    Re: Any British name for 'baloney', please?

    But have you tried it fried?

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Any British name for 'baloney', please?

    As a vegetarian (for 21 years!) all of those make me feel slightly nauseous but even in my omnivorous days, I wouldn't have touched Spam!

  6. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Any British name for 'baloney', please?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    Blech. Bologna is in no way fashionable, in my humble opinion. Maybe I'm prejudiced because the mere thought of bologna triggers my gag reflex, but to my mind high-end delicatessen food means prosciutto, corned beef, pastrami, etc. Bologna is in the same el disgusto category with olive loaf and Spam. (Mr. Ouisch loves both bologna and Spam and dares to call me "pretentious." Pish-tosh, I say!)
    She's right, it's the cheapest of pseudo-luncheon meats. At least over here.

  7. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Any British name for 'baloney', please?

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    But have you tried it fried?
    Eew. That was always my Dad's go-to lunch when Mom wasn't around to cook for him - a fried bologna sandwich. I figured he ate them either because it was the only thing he knew how to cook, or because he grew up during the Great Depression and it tasted like steak compared to a piece of stale bread crust dipped in lard.

  8. 5jj's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Any British name for 'baloney', please?

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    She's right, it's the cheapest of pseudo-luncheon meats. At least over here.
    I knew the picture reminded me of something. Luncheon meat. I used to love that when I was a child. I can't think why.
    Last edited by 5jj; 27-Jul-2011 at 22:09. Reason: typo

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