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    #1

    something from to get through

    As we know to get through means to succeed in a test. But a Chinese booklet explains "to get 60 marks for a test. " Is that correct? My another silly question is why to get through has something to do with a test but nothing to do with a hospital or a marriage or being enrolled by a university? Thanks!

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    #2

    Re: something from to get through

    Quote Originally Posted by notletrest View Post
    As we know "to get through" means "to succeed" in a test. But a Chinese booklet explains "to get 60 marks for a test. " Is that correct?
    What does it explain about getting 60 marks?

    My another silly question is why to "get through" has something to do with a test but nothing to do with a hospital or a marriage or being enrolled by a university/
    You can get through an operation. If the enrolment procedure for the university is particularly long and arduous, you might get through that.

    I find it difficult to imagine 'getting through' a marriage.

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    #3

    Re: something from to get through

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    You can get through an operation. If the enrolment procedure for the university is particularly long and arduous, you might get through that.

    I find it difficult to imagine 'getting through' a marriage.
    1) In your reply you asked me :"What does it explain about getting 60 marks?"
    I mean a Chinese booklet explains to get through , meaning to get 60 marks for a test." Because in China a test 's full marks are 100, if one gets 60 marks , that is , he passes. Is the explanation right?

    2) "You can get through an operation. If the enrolment procedure for the university is particularly long and arduous, you might get through that."
    Let's take an exasmple: Last month I took part in the enrolling test by a university and received an notice saying you have gotton through. Dose this mean I am enrolled by the university?

    3) "I find it difficult to imagine 'getting through' a marriage." --- Everyone has stardards in choosing spouse, which we can suppose as a test. When a girl told a young man you get through,that is to say , they will go together to the red blanket in a church,er?

    4) "hospital" . A hospital has its requirments in taking a patient in., for example, a children's hospital only takes children in. If the doctor says to a child :" You get through." Is that meant the child can be sent to it?

    can 2,) 3,) 4,) stand up?

    As we know to get through means to succeed in a test. My another silly question is why to get through only has something to do with a test but nothing to do with a hospital or a marriage or being enrolled by a university, of course, besides its other meanings?
    Thanks! I am all my ears to yours!

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    #4

    Re: something from to get through

    Quote Originally Posted by notletrest View Post
    1) In your reply you asked me :"What does it explain about getting 60 marks?"
    I mean a Chinese booklet explains to get through , meaning to get 60 marks for a test." Because in China a test 's, full marks are 100; if one gets 60 marks , that is , he passes. Is the explanation right?
    I think the word 'pass' would be clearer, but 'get through' is accptable here.

    2) "You can get through an operation. If the enrolment procedure for the university is particularly long and arduous, you might get through that."
    Let's take an exasmple: Last month I took part in the enrolling test by a university and received an notice saying "You have gotton through". Dose this mean I am enrolled by the university?
    You did not say that a test was part of the enrolment procedure. Here 'get through' the test means 'pass'; you have therefore, presumably been accepted by the university.

    3) "I find it difficult to imagine 'getting through' a marriage." --- Everyone has starndards in choosing spouse, which we can suppose as a test. When a girl told a young man you get through,that is to say , they will go together to the red blanket in a church,er?
    Sorry, but I don't understand this.

    4) "hospital" . A hospital has its requirements in taking a patient in., for example, a children's hospital only takes children in. If the doctor says to a child :" You get through." Is that meant the child can be sent to it?
    I cannot imagine any native speaking doctor saying this. Getting into hospital does not require passing a test.
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    #5

    Re: something from to get through

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    5
    Please don't grasp my examples and let my main idea alone. My trouble lies in the two words get and through have no relationship with a test at all, because behind through we can use a variety of words , including a test. Why does through only refer to a test but not othrs in the phrase to get through? Why should I put the question forward is how to memberize such phrases?
    By the way, "He got through a lot in his childhood." means he lived miseribly .I don't know why? Why we couldn't think he lived happily in his childhood? Please get me over.Thank you very much!

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    #6

    Re: something from to get through

    [QUOTE=notletrest;782319]Please don't grasp my examples and let my main idea alone. My trouble lies in the two words get and through have no relationship with a test at all, because behind through we can use a variety of words , including a test. Why does through only refer to a test but not othrs in the phrase to get through? Why should I put the question forward is how to memberize such phrases?
    By the way, "He went through a lot in his childhood." means he lived miseribly .I don't know why? Why we couldn't think he lived happily in his childhood? Please get me over.Thanks a lot !QUOTE]

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    #7

    Re: something from to get through

    There are no rules about phrasal verbs. Some of them have only one, fairly precise, meaning; others can be used with a variety of different meanings. Once cannot predict whether a phrasal verb will be appropriate in one context just because it is appropriate in another.

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    #8

    Re: something from to get through

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    There are no rules about phrasal verbs. Some of them have only one, fairly precise, meaning; others can be used with a variety of different meanings. Once cannot predict whether a phrasal verb will be appropriate in one context just because it is appropriate in another.
    1.Does your last sentence read : One cannot...appropriate for /to one...? In my last post I should change memeberize into memorize, Beg your pardon!
    2..I am tryig to find a bettr way out to memorize the English common phrasal verbs, so I put forward such silly questions about them. (get through a university, go through a lot = happily, break (in) a dog,etc). I deeply felt the difficulty to learn the phrasal verbs by heart, so I would like to do something helpful fo the Chinese younger generation ,so that they can remember them easily. I wonder whether there is the way. I hope to hear your quide sincerely! Thank you very much!

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