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    #1

    stopped short/ bound up in her work

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentence?

    One afternoon as I passed the disused room of the clinic, I stopped short. (B. J. Cronin, “Nurse Davies”)

    stopped short = stopped suddenly

    “You didn’t know, Doctor, that years ago I asked her to marry me. But she wouldn’t have me. Too bound up in her work.” “Ay, devoted, devoted to her work.”
    (B. J. Cronin, “Nurse Davies”)

    bound up in her work = fond on her work and busy with it

    V.

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    #2

    Re: stopped short/ bound up in her work

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentence?

    One afternoon as I passed the disused room of the clinic, I stopped short. (B. J. Cronin, “Nurse Davies”)

    stopped short = stopped suddenly

    “You didn’t know, Doctor, that years ago I asked her to marry me. But she wouldn’t have me. Too bound up in her work.” “Ay, devoted, devoted to her work.”
    (B. J. Cronin, “Nurse Davies”)

    bound up in her work = fond of her work and busy with it

    V.
    Semi-teacher and native.

    I would say that you have interpreted them correctly.

    Though for 'bound up in her work' doesn't have to mean that she is fond of it, just that she is really busy with it, hasn't got time for much else or prioritises it.

    'Stopped short' can mean to stop suddenly, in the context you provided it probably does. However, it can also mean to not quite go the whole lenght. For example, 'Although Tom worked on Saturday, he stopped short of working on Sunday.'

    I must say, having seen some of your other posts, you read very widely.

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