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  1. Banned
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    • Join Date: Aug 2011
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    #1

    Arrow reductions in / of

    In a study conducted by my colleagues at the University of Minnesota, large reductions in the price of healthy snacks did not necessarily lead people to substitute a more nutritious snack for a less healthy one.
    What is the difference between "reductions in" and "reductions of"?

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Jun 2008
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    #2

    Re: reductions in / of

    Quote Originally Posted by CaseyA View Post
    What is the difference between "reductions in" and "reductions of"?
    They are commonly used like this: "There has been a reduction of 10% in the price." That is, "There has been a reduction in the price of 10%."
    "Reduction of the price" is not wrong, but it's also not common. "Reduction in 10%", of course, is wrong.

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