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  1. rainous's Avatar
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    #1

    along with

    I would like to inform you that I have been granted a B level Clearance along with F level Clearance for my spouse.

    I would like to inform you that I have been granted a B level Clearance and F level Clearance for my spouse.


    Are these two sentences grammatically correct?
    If both don't feel natural to you, can you suggest alternatives?

    Thank you.
    Last edited by rainous; 11-Aug-2011 at 06:35.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: along with

    Neither is particularly clear. This is better, in my opinion.:

    I would like to inform you that I have been granted (a) B level Clearance, and my spouse (an) F level Clearance.
    Last edited by 5jj; 11-Aug-2011 at 11:42. Reason: typo

  3. rainous's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: along with

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    Neither is particularly clear. This is better, in my opinion.:

    I would like to inform you that I have been granted (a) B level Clearance, and spouse wife (an) F level Clearance.
    Thank you for your suggestion.

    When you say "Neither is particularly clear.", do you mean I should never use them because, if I did, I would come off as a foreigner who speaks lousy English or are you simply suggesting the alternative that seems better in YOUR OPINION?

    In other words, is it OK to use it even if it's not particularly clear or is it not OK at all?
    (The second one sounds weird to me too, but I feel like I could get away with the first one. Am I wrong to think that?)

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: along with

    Quote Originally Posted by rainous View Post
    Thank you for your suggestion.

    When you say "Neither is particularly clear.", do you mean I should never use them because, if I did, I would come off as a foreigner who speaks lousy English or are you simply suggesting the alternative that seems better in YOUR OPINION?
    I meant what I wrote - "Neither is particularly clear.

    They could both be interpreted in two ways:

    1. You have been granted a B level Clearance for yourself, and you have also been granted an F level Clearance for your wife.

    2. You have been granted a B and an F level Clearnce, both of them for your wife.

    In other words, is it OK to use it even if it's not particularly clear or is it not OK at all?
    (The second one sounds weird to me too, but I feel like I could get away with the first one. Am I wrong to think that?)
    It seems to me to be sensible to use a version that avoids ambiguity.

    ps. Note my editing of my first post. Sorry about the typos

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