Results 1 to 5 of 5
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: May 2011
    • Posts: 269
    #1

    Sacrifice

    Is my sentence is proper English?

    You should stop playing basketal untill, you bring up your grade.You can't have your cake and eat it too, you have to sacrifice something.

    Thank you so much for your response.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,218
    #2

    Re: Sacrifice

    Quote Originally Posted by arzgol View Post
    Is my sentence is proper English?

    You should stop playing basketball until you bring your grades up.You can't have your cake and eat it too. You have to sacrifice something.

    Thank you so much for your response.
    Note my corrections in bold.

    I'm not sure this is a good example of "having your cake and eating it too."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,307
    #3

    Re: Sacrifice

    It's not. This is more like "if you don't eat your meat, you can't have any pudding."

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: May 2011
    • Posts: 269
    #4

    Re: Sacrifice

    On the one hand, he is upset that he is behind his class because playing basketball is time-consuming, on the other hand, he doesn't like to quit playing basketball because he don't like to let his friends down.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,218
    #5

    Re: Sacrifice

    I"d say it's more like "Something got to give."

    "You can't marry the richest woman in the world and still be considered the most eligible bachelor in the world." That's an example of not having your cake and eating it too.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

Similar Threads

  1. sacrifices or sacrifice ?
    By tien-sung in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-Sep-2010, 13:28
  2. Whatever you choose to sacrifice,
    By angliholic in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-Nov-2007, 10:35
  3. mercy and sacrifice
    By blouen in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-Oct-2007, 13:30
  4. give up a sacrifice
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-Mar-2007, 19:59

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •