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    #1

    there is and have got

    Hi ,
    I would like to ask the difference between there is and have.
    For example,

    I have two friends at university = There are my two friends at university.

    Are they same?
    Thanks

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: there is and have got

    No, those are not equivalent.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

    • Member Info
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    #3

    there is and have got

    so , what is the difference?

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    #4

    Re: there is and have got

    I have two friends at university = There are two people at university who are my friends.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: there is and have got

    Quote Originally Posted by esmaa View Post
    Hi ,
    I would like to ask the difference between there is and have.
    For example,

    I have two friends at university = There are my two friends at university.

    Are they same?
    Thanks
    I have two friends at university = There are a lot of people at university but only two of them are my friends.

    There are my two friends at university = (not natural English but could be taken to mean) "Oh look over there, at the university. My two friends are visible".

    There are two friends at university = There are two people at university who are the friends of someone else, or friends of mine, or just friends with each other.

    As far as your title is concerned, there is rarely a link between "There is" and "have got".

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