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      • Native Language:
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      • China
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    • Join Date: Nov 2003
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    #1

    set to+n.

    Dear teachers,

    I have come across a sentence "If we set to work, we can fulfil our plan aheard of time".

    In the sentence " set to" is a "v. + prep." phrase. However, according to my dictionaries, "set to" is a "v.+adv." phrase, e.g.,

    1. Charlie took a helping of turkey, grabbed his knife and fork, and set to.
    2. One man catled the other a liar and they set to.

    So is this "v. + prep." a new use of the phrase?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #2

    Re: set to+n.

    The stress is different:

    [1] If we set to work (set to it, set ourselves to doing the work, set ourselves to undertaking the work), we can fulfil our plan ahead of time.

    [2] Charlie took a helping of turkey, and set to. (began eating vigorously)

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    #3

    Re: set to+n.


    Dear Cas,
    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see.

    Jiang


    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    The stress is different:

    [1] If we set to work (set to it, set ourselves to doing the work, set ourselves to undertaking the work), we can fulfil our plan ahead of time.

    [2] Charlie took a helping of turkey, and set to. (began eating vigorously)

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Nov 2003
    • Posts: 2,715
    #4

    Re: set to+n.


    Dear Cas,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see.

    Jiang


    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    The stress is different:

    [1] If we set to work (set to it, set ourselves to doing the work, set ourselves to undertaking the work), we can fulfil our plan ahead of time.

    [2] Charlie took a helping of turkey, and set to. (began eating vigorously)

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