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  1. leonardoatt's Avatar
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    #1

    Break the habit?

    Meaning of "I am breaking the habits"?

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Break the habit?

    Quote Originally Posted by leonardoatt View Post
    Meaning of "I am breaking the habits"?
    leonardoattt, please try to form a proper question: "What is the meaning of 'breaking the habits'?" If you break a habit, you manage to stop doing something that you did frequently, and that you did not like doing.

  3. leonardoatt's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Break the habit?

    I like brevity,abbreviation.

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Break the habit?

    Quote Originally Posted by leonardoatt View Post
    I like brevity,abbreviation.
    We like correct English. This is from the forum guidelines:

    This is a forum for discussing the English language. There is no need to write formally, but this is not a chatroom, so please write normal English, with punctuation, capital letters and words written in full; use you not u, I not i, great not gr8, etc. Don't worry about making mistakes, which is normal when learning a language, but do please try to make your English easy to read.

  5. leonardoatt's Avatar
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    #5

    Talking Re: Break the habit?

    Don't you think that Routine questions like "what is the meaning of" can be ridiculous?Pardon me.

  6. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Break the habit?

    Quote Originally Posted by leonardoatt View Post
    Don't you think that Routine questions like "what is the meaning of" can be ridiculous?Pardon me.
    No, they don't sound ridiculous. It's part of the language. Why make people guess your question?
    Meaning of "I am breaking the habits"? is not a proper English sentence, and is not an accepted English abbreviation - even though the meaning is fairly clear. Certainly you should try to learn when to abbreviate and when not to. For example "Why make people guess?" is an abbreviation of "Why do you want to make people guess the meaning of your question?" Part of learning English (or any language) is to know when words can be left out and when they can't [be].

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Break the habit?

    The other problem with not posting full questions/sentences on the forum is that other learners might look at your question and assume that it is correct. If they don't already know that what you mean is "What is the meaning of...?" they might think "Meaning of...?" is right and then repeat the mistake themselves.

    What you write and what you mean may be two very different things. We are not in the business of working out what people mean. We are in the business of helping people to construct full, correct, meaningful sentences in English.

    Many of the learners on this site still have a basic level of English and it's important that they see as much correct English as possible. You are doing a disservice to other learners by posting incorrect English on purpose and you do not help your own cause by repeatedly arguing with the teachers and native speakers on this site.

    You are here to learn and in order to do that you need to listen and take note of what you are told.

    I hope you will continue to take part in the forum in the correct spirit. You have a lot to learn and we are happy to help.

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